National Institute for Nanotechnology

National Institute for Nanotechnology

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2014
18 Aug 2014

Could hemp nanosheets topple graphene for making supercapacitors?

Scientists are reporting that fibers from the plant can pack as much energy and power as graphene, long-touted as the model material for supercapacitors.
7 Jul 2014

Researchers develop next-generation battery

A research team has used carbon nanomaterials to develop next-generation batteries capable of charging faster and lasting longer than today's standard lithium-ion batteries.
2013
3 Sep 2013

Discovery could make solar power cheaper, more accessible

University of Alberta researchers have found that abundant materials in the Earth's crust can be used to make inexpensive and easily manufactured nanoparticle-based solar cells.
2 Sep 2013

Discovery could make solar power cheaper, more accessible

Researchers have found that abundant materials in the Earth's crust can be used to make inexpensive and easily manufactured nanoparticle-based solar cells.
2010
6 Jul 2010

Longer life for plastic solar cells

A team of researchers from the University of Alberta and the National Institute for Nanotechnology has extended the operating life of an unsealed plastic solar cell from mere hours to eight months.
28 Jun 2010

Life of plastic solar cells jumps from hours to eight months

A team of researchers from the University of Alberta and the National Institute for Nanotechnology has extended the operating life of an unsealed plastic solar cell from mere hours to eight months.
2009
9 Oct 2009

Carbon nanotubes could make efficient solar cells

In a carbon nanotube-based photodiode, electrons (blue) and holes (red) - the positively charged areas where electrons used to be before becoming excited - release their excess energy to efficiently create more electron-hole pairs when light is shined on the device.
30 Sep 2009

Carbon nanotubes could make efficient solar cells

In a carbon nanotube-based photodiode, electrons (blue) and holes (red) - the positively charged areas where electrons used to be before becoming excited - release their excess energy to efficiently create more electron-hole pairs when light is shined on the device.