University of California, San Diego

University of California, San Diego

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The University of California, San Diego (also referred to as UC San Diego or UCSD) is a public research university located in La Jolla, California. UCSD is the seventh oldest of the ten University of California campuses and offers over 200 undergraduate and graduate degree programs, enrolling about 22,700 undergraduate and 6,300 graduate students. Institutional rankings of UC San Diego have commonly ranked the university very highly. For example, ScienceWatch ranks UCSD 7th of federally funded U.S. universities, based on the citation impact of their published research. UCSD established the Department of NanoEngineering within its Jacobs School of Engineering effective 2007. This sixth department will cover a broad range of topics, but focus particularly on biomedical nanotechnology, nanotechnologies for energy conversion, computational nanotechnology, and molecular and nanomaterials. The Department of NanoEngineering's educational program will develop in phases, with plans to reach a steady state of approximately 20 faculty members and an enrollment of 400 undergraduate students and 120 graduate students.
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2019
3 Oct

Stretchable and flexible biofuel cell that runs on sweat

A unique new flexible and stretchable device, worn against the skin and capable of producing electrical energy by transforming the compounds present in sweat, was recently developed. This cell is already capable of continuously lighting an LED, opening new avenues for the development of wearable electronics powered by autonomous and environmentally friendly biodevices.
24 Sep

Shape-shifting robots built from 'smarticles'

Building conventional robots typically requires carefully combining components like motors, batteries, actuators, body segments, legs and wheels. Now, researchers have taken a new approach, building a robot entirely from smaller robots known as "smarticles" to unlock the principles of a potentially new locomotion technique.
26 Aug

Study identifies main culprit behind lithium metal battery failure

A research team has discovered the root cause of why lithium metal batteries fail—bits of lithium metal deposits break off from the surface of the anode during discharging and are trapped as "dead" or inactive lithium that the battery can no longer access.
22 Aug

Robotic contact lens controlled by the eyes

A research team has developed a soft robotic lens whose movements are controlled by the eyes—blink twice and the lens zooms in and out; look left, right, up or down and the lens will follow.
17 Jul

3D printed get up and go bots getting closer, study says

Robotics researchers have for the first time used a commercial 3D printer to embed complex sensors inside robotic limbs and grippers. But they found that materials commercially available for 3D printing still need to be improved before the robots can be fully functional.
11 Jun

New mechanism allows lower energy requirement for OLED displays

Scientists have found a way to significantly reduce the amount of energy required by organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). OLEDs have attracted attention as potential replacements for liquid crystal diodes, since they offer advantages such as being flexible, thin, and not requiring backlighting.
4 Jun

Technique unlocks graphene for semiconductors

To truly be useful, graphene would need to carry an electric current that switches on and off, as silicon does in the form of billions of transistors on a computer chip.
4 Jun

Electronic Skin Patches 2019-2029

IDTechEx Report: James Hayward and Dr Nadia Tsao
21 May

Cooling and heating patch serves as personal thermostat

Engineers have developed a wearable patch that could provide personalized cooling and heating at home, work, or on the go.
7 May

Robots to the rhino rescue

With just two northern white rhinos remaining in the world, both of whom are female, scientists are racing against the clock to rescue the species from the brink of extinction. Decades of poaching and habitat loss have led to their dramatic decline. Hope for their survival now rests on scientists' ability to develop innovative methods for repopulating the species.
11 Apr

Printed sensors provide on the spot fentanyl detection

Researchers have developed screen-printed sensors that could offer a faster, convenient and low-cost method to detect the drug fentanyl. The sensors can detect micromolar concentrations of fentanyl in just one minute. They are easy to produce, cost only a few cents apiece, and are disposable.
22 Mar

Robots to assist dementia caregivers

Building robots that can help people with dementia has been a longtime goal for roboticists. Yet until now, no one has sought to survey informal caregivers, such as family members, about what characteristics and roles these robots should have.
21 Feb

Charting a path to cheaper flexible solar cells

There's a lot to like about perovskite-based solar cells. They are simple and cheap to produce, offer flexibility that could unlock a wide new range of installation methods and places, and in recent years have reached energy efficiencies approaching those of traditional silicon-based cells. But figuring out how to produce perovskite-based energy devices that last longer than a couple of months has been a challenge.
19 Feb

Unleashing perovskites' potential for solar cells

Researchers have been able to decipher a key aspect of the behavior of perovskites made with different formulations: With certain additives there is a kind of "sweet spot" where greater amounts will enhance performance and beyond which further amounts begin to degrade it.
19 Feb

Vagus nerve stimulation eases PTSD

In a randomized, controlled pilot trial, participants pre-treated with noninvasive vagus nerve stimulation experienced less pain after heat stimulus than mock-treated participants.
6 Feb

CRISPR/Cas9 to control genetic inheritance in mice

Biologists have developed the world's first CRISPR/Cas9-based approach to control genetic inheritance in a mammal.
16 Jan

3D printed implant treats spinal cord injury

For the first time, researchers have used rapid 3D printing technologies to create a spinal cord, then successfully implanted that scaffolding, loaded with neural stem cells, into sites of severe spinal cord injury in rats.
15 Jan

CRISPR-based technology to control pests

Combining historical lessons with modern genetic technologies, scientists have developed a new way to control and suppress populations of insects, potentially including those that ravage agricultural crops and transmit deadly diseases.
2018
9 Oct

Using personal data to predict blood pressure

Engineers used wearable off-the-shelf technology and machine learning to predict, for the first time, an individual's blood pressure and provide personalized recommendations to lower it based on this data.
17 Sep

Wearable ultrasound patch monitors blood pressure deep inside body

A new wearable ultrasound patch that non-invasively monitors blood pressure in arteries deep beneath the skin could help people detect cardiovascular problems earlier on and with greater precision. In tests, the patch performed as well as some clinical methods to measure blood pressure.