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University of California, San Diego

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University of California, San Diego

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The University of California, San Diego (also referred to as UC San Diego or UCSD) is a public research university located in La Jolla, California. UCSD is the seventh oldest of the ten University of California campuses and offers over 200 undergraduate and graduate degree programs, enrolling about 22,700 undergraduate and 6,300 graduate students. Institutional rankings of UC San Diego have commonly ranked the university very highly. For example, ScienceWatch ranks UCSD 7th of federally funded U.S. universities, based on the citation impact of their published research. UCSD established the Department of NanoEngineering within its Jacobs School of Engineering effective 2007. This sixth department will cover a broad range of topics, but focus particularly on biomedical nanotechnology, nanotechnologies for energy conversion, computational nanotechnology, and molecular and nanomaterials. The Department of NanoEngineering's educational program will develop in phases, with plans to reach a steady state of approximately 20 faculty members and an enrollment of 400 undergraduate students and 120 graduate students.
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2019
11 Apr

Printed sensors provide on the spot fentanyl detection

Researchers have developed screen-printed sensors that could offer a faster, convenient and low-cost method to detect the drug fentanyl. The sensors can detect micromolar concentrations of fentanyl in just one minute. They are easy to produce, cost only a few cents apiece, and are disposable.
22 Mar

Robots to assist dementia caregivers

Building robots that can help people with dementia has been a longtime goal for roboticists. Yet until now, no one has sought to survey informal caregivers, such as family members, about what characteristics and roles these robots should have.
21 Feb

Charting a path to cheaper flexible solar cells

There's a lot to like about perovskite-based solar cells. They are simple and cheap to produce, offer flexibility that could unlock a wide new range of installation methods and places, and in recent years have reached energy efficiencies approaching those of traditional silicon-based cells. But figuring out how to produce perovskite-based energy devices that last longer than a couple of months has been a challenge.
19 Feb

Unleashing perovskites' potential for solar cells

Researchers have been able to decipher a key aspect of the behavior of perovskites made with different formulations: With certain additives there is a kind of "sweet spot" where greater amounts will enhance performance and beyond which further amounts begin to degrade it.
19 Feb

Vagus nerve stimulation eases PTSD

In a randomized, controlled pilot trial, participants pre-treated with noninvasive vagus nerve stimulation experienced less pain after heat stimulus than mock-treated participants.
6 Feb

CRISPR/Cas9 to control genetic inheritance in mice

Biologists have developed the world's first CRISPR/Cas9-based approach to control genetic inheritance in a mammal.
16 Jan

3D printed implant treats spinal cord injury

For the first time, researchers have used rapid 3D printing technologies to create a spinal cord, then successfully implanted that scaffolding, loaded with neural stem cells, into sites of severe spinal cord injury in rats.
15 Jan

CRISPR-based technology to control pests

Combining historical lessons with modern genetic technologies, scientists have developed a new way to control and suppress populations of insects, potentially including those that ravage agricultural crops and transmit deadly diseases.
2018
9 Oct

Using personal data to predict blood pressure

Engineers used wearable off-the-shelf technology and machine learning to predict, for the first time, an individual's blood pressure and provide personalized recommendations to lower it based on this data.
17 Sep

Wearable ultrasound patch monitors blood pressure deep inside body

A new wearable ultrasound patch that non-invasively monitors blood pressure in arteries deep beneath the skin could help people detect cardiovascular problems earlier on and with greater precision. In tests, the patch performed as well as some clinical methods to measure blood pressure.
23 Aug

Building up stretchable electronics to be multipurpose as smartphones

By stacking and connecting layers of stretchable circuits on top of one another, engineers have developed an approach to build soft, pliable "3D stretchable electronics" that can pack a lot of functions while staying thin and small in size.
21 Aug

Second-life Electric Vehicle Batteries 2019-2029

IDTechEx Report: Dr Na Jiao
14 Aug

Biomedical Diagnostics at Point-of-Care 2019-2029: Technologies, Applications, Forecasts

IDTechEx Report: Dr Luyun Jiang
14 Aug

Technologies for Diabetes Management 2019-2029: Technology, Players and Forecasts

IDTechEx Report: James Hayward
6 Aug

Biosensor chip wirelessly detects disease

Researchers have developed a chip that can detect a type of genetic mutation known as a single nucleotide polymorphism and wirelessly send the results in real time to a smartphone, computer, or other electronic device. The chip is at least 1,000 times more sensitive at detecting an SNP than current technology.
4 Jul

Diesel doesn't float this boat

Marine research could soon be possible without the risk of polluting either the air or the ocean. It's thanks to a new ship design and feasibility study.
2 Jul

Electronic Skin Patches 2018-2028

IDTechEx Report: James Hayward
4 Jun

Cell-like nanorobots clear bacteria and toxins from blood

Engineers have developed tiny ultrasound-powered robots that can swim through blood, removing harmful bacteria along with the toxins they produce. These proof-of-concept nanorobots could one day offer a safe and efficient way to detoxify and decontaminate biological fluids.
23 May

Researchers operate lab-grown heart cells by remote control

Researchers have developed a technique that allows them to speed up or slow down human heart cells growing in a dish on command — simply by shining a light on them and varying its intensity. The cells are grown on graphene, which converts light into electricity, providing a more realistic environment than standard plastic or glass laboratory dishes.
21 May

Wearable Technology 2018-2028: Markets, Players, Forecasts

IDTechEx Report: James Hayward
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