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2018
18 Aug

Imprint Energy, Inc.

Imprint Energy is a start-up based in Alameda, California. Their main product is ZincPoly™, with zinc and metal oxide electrodes and a non-flammable, non-toxic solid-state gel electrolyte. This battery chemistry can be screen printed
15 Aug

A new battle of the currents takes center stage

This coming November 14-15 at the Santa Clara Convention Center, leading players in the battery and energy storage industry will compete to capture the audience's attention over what technology is set to dominate in the coming decade.
14 Aug

Soft multifunctional robots get really small

Robots could be safely deployed in difficult-to-access environments, such as in delicate surgical procedures in the human body.
6 Aug

Biosensor chip wirelessly detects disease

Researchers have developed a chip that can detect a type of genetic mutation known as a single nucleotide polymorphism and wirelessly send the results in real time to a smartphone, computer, or other electronic device. The chip is at least 1,000 times more sensitive at detecting an SNP than current technology.
6 Aug

AI device identifies objects at the speed of light

A team of electrical and computer engineers has created a physical artificial neural network -- a device modeled on how the human brain works -- that can analyze large volumes of data and identify objects at the actual speed of light. The device was created using a 3D printer.
31 Jul

Researchers develop graphene-enhanced biophotovoltaic technology

Existing photovoltaic technology is not fully capable of realizing the promise of sustainable solar energy. Commercial and emerging photovoltaic technologies require energy-intensive extracting and manufacturing processes and often require metals like tin that generate social conflict and environmental harm with their mining. Slave and child labor, along with rampant environmental destruction and pollution are widespread in the tin mining industry, which in some places is even controlled by militias to fund wars.
4 Jul

Diesel doesn't float this boat

Marine research could soon be possible without the risk of polluting either the air or the ocean. It's thanks to a new ship design and feasibility study.
2 Jul

3D Bioprinting - An Update from Q2 2018

The past 3 months has been busy for 3D bioprinting companies, with numerous publications emerging from academia and announcements from industry. This article will highlight the advancements made in 3D bioprinting in the last 3 months since the publication of the 2018 update of IDTechEx's market research report on the topic: 3D Bioprinting 2018 - 2028: Technologies, Markets, Forecasts.
2 Jul

Uber urges drivers to go electric

Studies have found that when shared and electric mobility are properly combined, along with automation, we can shrink the number of vehicles on the road and reduce transportation's climate footprint. That's why Uber has launched the EV Champions Initiative, a pilot program for driver-partners to deliver at least 5 million EV rides over the next year.
29 Jun

CRISPR reduces autism symptoms in mice

Scientists have used CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing to lessen some autism symptoms in mice with a form of fragile X syndrome, the most common known single-gene cause of autism spectrum disorder.
27 Jun

Tracking cancer-cell development with "drinkable" electronic sensors

Thanks to an unorthodox approach being proposed by researchers, patients may soon be able to track their illness simply by drinking a solution containing millions of tiny electronic sensors disguised as bacteria.
19 Jun

Heliotrope Technologies

Heliotrope Technologies is a smart glass technology start-up. This company is commercialising an exciting third generation electrochromic technology, which holds high promise.
12 Jun

Campus delivery robots

A UC Berkeley startup called Kiwi thinks they've cracked a way to efficiently use robots to deliver food to your door. The company plans to expand outside of Berkeley later this year.
11 Jun

New machine learning approach could accelerate bioengineering

Scientists have developed a way to use machine learning to dramatically accelerate the design of microbes that produce biofuel.
4 Jun

Cell-like nanorobots clear bacteria and toxins from blood

Engineers have developed tiny ultrasound-powered robots that can swim through blood, removing harmful bacteria along with the toxins they produce. These proof-of-concept nanorobots could one day offer a safe and efficient way to detoxify and decontaminate biological fluids.
1 Jun

Biomaterial helps regrow brain tissue after stroke in mice

New stroke-healing gel helped regrow neurons and blood vessels in mice with stroke-damaged brains, hinting at what may someday be a new therapy for stroke in people.
23 May

3D printer that can create complex biological tissues

A bioengineer has developed a technique that uses a specially adapted 3D printer to build therapeutic biomaterials from multiple materials. The advance could be a step toward on-demand printing of complex artificial tissues for use in transplants and other surgeries.
23 May

Researchers operate lab-grown heart cells by remote control

Researchers have developed a technique that allows them to speed up or slow down human heart cells growing in a dish on command — simply by shining a light on them and varying its intensity. The cells are grown on graphene, which converts light into electricity, providing a more realistic environment than standard plastic or glass laboratory dishes.
2 May

Why a robot can't yet outjump a flea

When it comes to things that are ultrafast and lightweight, robots can't hold a candle to the fastest-jumping insects and other small-but-powerful creatures. New research could help explain why nature still beats robots, and describes how machines might take the lead.
30 Apr

Transparent robot swims silently underwater

An innovative, eel-like robot developed by engineers and marine biologists can swim silently in salt water without an electric motor. Instead, the robot uses artificial muscles filled with water to propel itself. The foot-long robot, which is connected to an electronics board that remains on the surface, is also virtually transparent.
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