Sensors and Actuators Report

Force Sensing in User Interfaces 2017-2027

Applications, technologies and players

User interfaces move beyond touch, enabling a new $1.8bn market in the coming decade
 
Table of Contents
1.EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
1.1.Force, pressure and displacement
1.2.The transducer itself varies significantly
1.3.Force sensing technology: categories and companies
1.4.Force sensing is already well established in many sectors
1.5.2015: Force sensing enters mainstream consumer electronics
1.6.Beyond the first adopters: drivers towards force sensing
1.7.Force: here to stay or part of a bigger trend?
1.8.Development of new user input technologies
1.9.Evolution of displays and the GUI
1.10.Force as one piece of a bigger picture
1.11.This report will focus on user interface technologies
2.INTRODUCTION: FORCE SENSING IN USER INTERFACES
2.1.Force sensing within user interfaces
2.2.Beyond touch...
2.3.The benefits of adding force sensing to a user interface
2.4.Confirming an intention behind an input
2.5.Intent: vital for safety with heavy machinery
2.6.Creating more advanced and/or realistic tactile input options
2.7.Tactile input options: Musical instruments & Gaming
2.8.Tactile input options: Appliances
2.9.Shortcuts in productivity apps
2.10.Additional security
2.11.Enabling new applications
2.12.Historic examples of force sensing in smartphones
2.13.Historic examples of force sensing in smartphones
2.14.Why now for force touch integration?
2.15.Force: here to stay or part of a bigger trend?
2.16.Development of new user input technologies
2.17.Evolution of displays and the GUI
3.FORCE SENSORS IN DISPLAYS
3.1.The importance of sensors in displays
3.2.Predecessors to force touch
3.3.Advantages over incumbent systems
3.4.Apple's introduction of Force Touch and 3D Touch
3.5.Other commercial examples of force touch: Huawei
3.6.Other commercial examples of force touch: ZTE
3.7.Choices of sensor position in the display: Bezel
3.8.Choices of sensor position in the display: On-Cell
3.9.Choices of sensor position in the display: In-Cell
3.10.Choices of sensor position in the display: Behind-Cell
3.11.Considerations by position
3.12.Mechanical force sensing in the display bezel
3.13.System construction and working principle
3.14.IP examples from the largest players
3.15.Other IP examples
3.16.Technology applicability by display force sensor type
3.17.Forecasts: Force sensors in touch screens (volume)
3.18.Forecasts: Force sensors in touch screens (revenue)
3.19.Forecast methodology
4.FORCE SENSING TECHNOLOGY
4.1.Technology options for force sensing
4.2.Definitions
4.3.Technology benchmarking
4.4.Benchmarking: key and descriptions
5.CAPACITIVE FORCE SENSING
5.1.Capacitive Force Sensing
5.2.Capacitive force sensing in smartphones
5.3.Force sensing in Apple's 3D Touch
5.4.Another example: EAP Strain Sensor
6.RESISTIVE FORCE SENSING
6.1.Resistive force sensing
6.2.Metal / foil strain gauge load cells
6.3.Example Suppliers: VPG and HBM
6.4.Applications for strain gauges
6.5.Industrial markets dominate applications
6.6.Semiconductor strain gauges
6.7.Different types of "piezoresistors"
6.8.Sensor construction and response type
6.9.Force sensing resistor design
6.10.Sensor implementation in devices
6.11.Transparent FSRs have been developed
6.12.Transparent FSR for displays: Progress and Targets
6.13.Piezoresistive textiles
6.14.Artificial skin made with gold nanoparticles
6.15.Artificial skin made with gold nanoparticles (cont.)
6.16.Example applications for FSRs
6.17.Force Sensing Resistors: Players
7.PIEZOELECTRIC FORCE SENSING
7.1.Piezoelectric force sensors
7.2.Implementation: Force overlay on touch screen
7.3.Implementation: Force and touch added together
7.4.Piezoelectric overlays for displays
7.5.In-cell architecture
8.OTHER TYPES OF FORCE SENSOR
8.1.Active stylus force sensing
8.2.Deriving force from touch sensing area
8.3.Force sensor types: Conclusions
9.EXAMPLES OF FORCE SENSOR TECHNOLOGY COMPANIES
9.1.FSRs: Tekscan, Interlink Electronics, Sensitronics
9.2.NextInput
9.3.Synaptics
9.4.Stantum, Nissha and Peratech: "DMR technology"
9.5.Vissumo, QSI Corporation and Beijer Electronics
9.6.F-Origin/MyOrigo
10.HAPTICS: AN ESSENTIAL PART OF THE FORCE SENSING USER INTERFACE
10.1.The importance of haptics in force sensing
10.2.What are haptics?
10.3.The broader haptics industry: two sides
10.4.Haptic Technologies: A brief overview
10.5.How the sense of touch works
10.6.The potential value-adds from haptic feedback
10.7.Reasons for the difference: Potential vs Actual use
10.8.LRA vs ERM: Which is best for smartphones?
10.9.Technology Summary: ERMs
10.10.Examples of ERM Motor Suppliers
10.11.ERM Drivers
10.12.Technology Summary: LRAs
10.13.Apple's Taptic Engine
10.14.Examples of Linear Actuator Suppliers
11.MARKETS
11.1.Musical Instruments
11.2.Consumer Electronics: Touch devices
11.3.Consumer Electronics: Peripheries
11.4.Automotive: Advanced user interfaces
11.5.Industrial
11.6.Overview by application
11.7.Forecast by application: (revenues from force sensors in user interfaces by product category)
12.OTHER RELATED USES FOR FORCE SENSING
12.1.Medical & Dental
12.2.Automotive: Occupancy Sensors
12.3.Robotics: control and end effectors
13.MARKET FORECASTING: 2016-2026
13.1.Forecast Details and Assumptions
13.2.Product categories (summary)
13.3.Products with force sensing UI (volume, 2015-2027)
13.4.Volumes: Consumer electronics sector
13.5.Volumes: Automotive, medical, industrial, other
13.6.Price of force sensor integration (by product, 2015-2027)
13.7.Price of force sensor integration (by product, 2015-2027)
13.8.Products with force sensing UI (revenue, 2015-2027)
13.9.Revenue from consumer electronics applications
13.10.Revenue from automotive, medical, industrial and others
13.11.Force sensor % integration by sector (consumer electronics)
13.12.Force sensor % integration by sector (wearable technology)
13.13.Technology forecasts: 2017 - 2027
13.14.Technology by product type
13.15.Definitions & Abbreviations