Unsatisfied RFID needs

Unsatisfied RFID needs

Unsatisfied RFID needs
Challenges
The following is a list of unsatisifed needs based on IDTechEx interviews with users:
 
• Disposable RFID tags below 10 cents, working at 1 meter or more available as catalogue items.
 
• Paper day / transit / single journey tickets that work like proximity smart cards ie at one or two cms, yet cost 10 cents - preferably 5 cents.
 
• Ultra small tags for anti-counterfeiting and logistics with jewellery, and other small products.
 
• Colour dot matrix displays and remotely rewriteable displays cheap enough to go on tickets and smart labels.
 
• Cards and labels that can act as pagers, radiotelephones, for medical diagnostics, television, radio, library, voice-activated computer, voice web access/retrieval, radio location.
 
• Tags that can be radio located at low cost. The hand-held card-shaped locator that senses the tag may simply have an arrow and a distance and work off a button battery and be used for such purposes as tracing kidnapped or lost children (market researchers IDC see the global market for location-based services rising from $600 million in 2000 to $5 billion in 2005).
 
• Cheaper hands-free staff access control of highest security.
 
• Air cards (ticketless travel, purse etc) that double as passport, visa, ID all interrogated at meters away (vicinity) and work for payment at 1cm or so (proximity) but low cost.
 
• Non-stop road tolling on multilane highways with no obstructions yet high integrity, (all shapes of vehicle weaving in and out). A low-cost smart label is needed in the vehicle windshield.
 
• Retailers must be absolutely sure that the products on their shelves are authentic; they need to instantly detect when, where and by whom the goods were made and instantly detect product theft efficiently and effectively.
 
• Manufacturers must be able to produce to demand, cutting wastage, making their processes more efficient, and so making it easier to hold prices.
 
• Manufacturing should be more efficient in its use of resources, and by RFID coding packaging, far more can be recycled. Suitable low-cost smart labels are needed.
 
Microwave ovens should sense a tag on prepared food and automatically cook it correctly.
 
• Washing machines should sense tags on all clothing and program accordingly, rejecting inappropriate items - even saying out loud what the inappropriate item is.
 
• More RFID companies should be offering a global service with appropriate economies of scale, particularly system integrators.
 
• Acquisitive companies that will rationalise fragmented smart label sectors and give better, lower cost "one-stop-shopping" to the purchaser of such systems.
 
• Companies using CCTV and tags intelligently coupled eg in supermarket trolley theft prevention.
 
• Systems that can track people with things eg in an airport, where is that particular vehicle and who is driving it? Did the same person enter the plane that checked in their bag?
 
• Medical consumables tagged so the surgeon can wave a gadget over the patient to detect if he left anything in them, and what, after operating. The nurse should similarly be able to detect if dangerous disposables have been put in the wrong waste bin. Just hold an RFID detector near and stock control be carried out without opening multipacks.
 
• Product handshaking such as holding a gadget over a box of pills to check the right instructions and pots are in there and the box is the right one.
 
• Contactless chip tickets that can be read and written too at a few centimeters (proximity) for fare payment on boarding a bus, and can be read at 1m (vicinity) on alighting to gather data and prevent fraud.
 
Antenna-on-chip low-cost RFID with a range of more than the current 1 cm (to go on test tubes, behind jewellery etc.) and price below 10 cents in volume.
• 5-10 cents smart labels with read-write capability and several meters range - for vehicles and conveyances.
 
• Globally harmonised radiation regulations so RFID tags have the same performance wherever they are sold.
 
FMCG companies need improved product safety and better merchandising as well as gimmicks.
 
• FMCG retailers need electronic shelf and product labels that instantly display price changes from the central database.