Bewertung von Materialien, Prozessinnovationen und Quantifizierung des Marktes für neue Anforderungen an EMI-Abschirmungen

EMI-Abschirmung für Elektronik 2024-2034: Prognosen, Technologien, Anwendungen

Materialien, Methoden und Anwendungen für die Abschirmung elektromagnetischer Interferenzen (EMI), einschließlich Abschirmung auf Verpackungsebene, Sputtern, Drucken, leitfähige Tinten, MXene, Nanokohlenstoffe, heterogene Integration, System-in-Package, Kompartimentierung.


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'EMI Shielding for Electronics: 2024-2034' explores the current status and technology trends within this essential aspect of many electronic circuits. Drawing on IDTechEx's expertise in evaluating developments within both advanced semiconductor packaging and conductive inks, the report provides a comprehensive overview of the status, innovations, players, and opportunities across this essential field.
 
As wirelessly connected devices continue to proliferate, innovations in EMI shielding will support the transition to higher communication frequencies and increasingly compact semiconductor package architectures for applications such as AR/VR and wearable electronics. These developments include new deposition methods such as spraying, inkjet printing, and fully additive 3D electronics along with new materials such as particle free conductive inks and MXenes.
 
From board to package-level shielding
A significant and growing trend in EMI shielding for electronics is the transition from board-level shielding towards conformal package-level shielding. The former, which describes soldering a conductive enclosure onto the board, is low-cost and well-established, but substantially increases size and weight. In contrast the latter approach utilizes a thin conductive layer directly on the package surface, which reduces size and weight. This makes conformal package-level shielding well suited to packages where compactness is a priority, such as smartwatches, smartphones, and some medical devices.
 
Emerging deposition methods
Sputtering is the dominant method of creating conformal EMI shields. Deposition occurs in a vacuum chamber, with ions fired at a metallic 'sputtering target' to produce nanoscale metal particles that coat the package surface. While the capital equipment is expensive the metallic sputtering targets are cost effective, with many providers having existing systems installed.
 
Emerging methods such as spraying and printing offer much lower equipment costs since no vacuum chamber is required, along with additional benefits such as reduced variation in package top and side coating thickness and fewer process steps. However, conductive inks are typically more expensive than equivalent sputtering targets per gram of deposited material due to the additional ink formulation steps.
 
An additional benefit of techniques such as inkjet printing is digital selective deposition, which enables reduced material consumption and hence mitigates the higher material costs of conductive inks. As the trend towards 'system-in-package' architectures gains further traction, greater use of compartmentalization will increase demand for selective deposition such as the top of a specific compartment. In the longer-term approaches such as fully additive 3D electronics will enable EMI shielding to be integrated throughout a complex bespoke package containing multiple compartmentalized components.
 
Material developments
While materials for board-level shielding enclosures and indeed sputtering are straightforward metals and metal alloys (typically copper, steel, aluminium, zinc, or nickel), there is considerable innovation within solution processable conductors for package level shielding. Silver-based conductive inks dominate, with available products spanning a wide range of particle sizes and rheology.
 
Especially notable is the increasing adoption of particle-free (also known as molecular) inks, which are metallized in-situ and hence produce smooth coatings and eliminate the risk of nozzle clogging. Metamaterials, in which periodic structures are introduced during manufacturing, can also be used to introduce frequency dependent EMI shielding if desired. Another material alternative for solutions processable EMI shielding is MXenes. This term refers to a class of materials made up of metal carbides or metal nitrides that have excellent conductivity and are lightweight.
 
Comprehensive coverage
This report provides a detailed overview of the 'EMI shielding for electronics' market, with a focus on innovations that will support that the increasing adoption of heterogeneous integration. 10-year forecasts for both deposition method and conductive ink consumption are provided, drawing on analysis of consumer electronic device to assesses the semiconductor package area requiring conformal shielding. Forecasts are segmented across multiple application categories including smartphones, laptops, tablets, smartwatches, AR/VR devices, vehicles, and telecoms infrastructure.
 
Key aspects
This report provides detailed market intelligence about trends and opportunities within the 'EMI shielding for electronics' market. This includes:
 
Technology evaluation
  • Assessment of the trend from board to package level shielding.
  • Discussion of semiconductor packaging trends, including increasing adoption of system-in-package architectures and heterogeneous integration.
  • Evaluation of competing deposition methods for conformal shielding, covering sputtering, plating, spraying and various printing types.
  • A review of the fundamentals associated with EMI shielding.
  • Analysis of the competing materials for EMI shielding, including multiple types of conductive inks and early stage technologies such as MXenes.
  • Discussion of where different types of EMI shielding are required, and the required standards.
 
Value chain analysis
  • Identification of equipment producers and material suppliers for each deposition technique.
  • Assessment of equipment capabilities
  • Evaluation of competing strategies and business models.
  • Analysis of recent innovations.
 
Market forecasts
  • 10-year forecasts for both deposition method and conductive ink consumption
  • These draw on analysis of consumer electronic device to assesses the semiconductor package area requiring conformal shielding.
  • Forecasts are segmented across multiple application categories including smartphones, laptops, tablets, smartwatches, AR/VR devices, vehicles, and telecommunications infrastructure.
 
Key questions answered
  • Where is EMI shielding currently required?
  • How will EMI shielding be affected by trends in semiconductor packaging such as heterogeneous integration and system-in-package architectures.
  • What are the emerging deposition techniques, and what are their benefits?
  • What are the innovative materials for EMI shielding, and what are their prospects?
  • What is the market forecast for new deposition techniques and materials?
  • What are the material requirements of EMI shielding in consumer electronics devices?
  • Which players are involved in each step of the FHE value chain?
Report MetricsDetails
Forecast Period2024 - 2034
Forecast UnitsArea (m^2), Revenue (US$ millions)
Regions CoveredWorldwide
Segments CoveredSegmented by application area: Consumer electronics (laptops, tablets, smartphones, smartwatches), telecommunications, automotive. Segmented by material/deposition methods: sputtering, conductive inks, plating.
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Table of Contents
1.EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
1.1.EMI shielding for semiconductor packaging: Analyst viewpoint (I)
1.2.EMI shielding for semiconductor packaging: Analyst viewpoint (II)
1.3.What is electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding?
1.4.How does EMI shielding work?
1.5.Factors driving developments in EMI shielding
1.6.What materials are used for EMI shielding?
1.7.Impact of trends in integrated circuit demand on EMI shielding industry
1.8.Impact of changes in semiconductor package design
1.9.Key trends for EMI shielding implementation
1.10.Package shielding involves compartmental and conformal shielding
1.11.Conformal package-level shielding driven by demand for compactness
1.12.Value chain for conformal package-level shielding
1.13.Key trends for EMI shielding deposition methods
1.14.Comparison of sputtering and spraying
1.15.Conclusions: Sputtering for package-level EMI shielding
1.16.Conclusions: Spraying/printing for package-level EMI shielding
1.17.Conclusions: Other deposition methods for package-level EMI shielding
1.18.Conclusions: Materials for board level shielding
1.19.Conclusions: Metallic inks for EMI shielding
1.20.Conclusions: Nanocarbon-based materials for EMI shielding
1.21.10-year forecast: Conformal EMI shielding surface area by deposition method
1.22.10-year forecast: Conformal EMI shielding revenue by deposition method
2.INTRODUCTION
2.1.Principles and motivation for EMI shielding
2.1.1.What is electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding?
2.1.2.How does EMI shielding work?
2.1.3.Classifying sources of electromagnetic interference
2.1.4.Shielding effectiveness scale
2.1.5.EMI shielding is frequency specific
2.1.6.Modes of electromagnetic interference
2.1.7.Quantifying EMI shielding: Shielding effectiveness
2.1.8.Assessing the shielding effectiveness of multiple materials
2.1.9.EMI shielding requirements
2.1.10.Requirements of conductive inks for conformal and compartmental EMI shielding
2.1.11.Nested shielding motivates precise EMI shielding deposition methods
2.1.12.Standards for EMI shielding
2.1.13.The challenge of magnetic shielding at low frequencies (I)
2.1.14.The challenge of magnetic shielding at low frequencies (II)
2.2.Board vs package level shielding
2.2.1.Conventional shielding techniques limited to board-level protection
2.2.2.Transition from board to package level shielding
2.2.3.Compartmental and conformal shielding
2.3.Trends in semiconductor packaging and effect on EMI shielding
2.3.1.Towards advanced semiconductor packaging / heterogenous
2.3.2.From 1D to 3D semiconductor packaging
2.3.3.Semiconductor packaging - technology overview
2.3.4.Metallic inks important for heterogeneous integration
2.3.5.Early commercial example of package-level shielding
2.3.6.Conformal package-level EMI shielding accompanied by compartmentalization
2.3.7.What does heterogeneous integration mean for EMI shielding?
2.3.8.Antenna-in-package (AiP): introduction
2.3.9.Two types of AiP structures
2.3.10.Design concept of AiP and its benefits
2.3.11.Three ways of mmWave antenna integration
3.MARKET FORECASTS
3.1.Forecast methodology
3.2.Market forecasts by surface area
3.2.1.10-year forecast: Conformal EMI shielding surface area by deposition method
3.2.2.Conformal EMI shielding surface area by deposition method: Proportion
3.2.3.10-year forecast: Sputtering for conformal EMI shielding surface area
3.2.4.10-year forecast: Spraying/printing for conformal EMI shielding surface area
3.2.5.10-year forecast: Plating for conformal EMI shielding surface area
3.2.6.10-year forecast: Conformal EMI surface area coated with flake-based inks
3.2.7.10-year forecast: Conformal EMI surface area coated with nanoparticle/hybrid inks
3.2.8.10-year forecast: Conformal EMI surface area coated with particle free inks
3.3.Market forecasts by surface area
3.3.1.10-year forecast: Conformal EMI shielding revenue by deposition method
3.3.2.10-year forecast: Proportional change in conformal EMI shielding revenue by deposition method
3.3.3.10-year forecast: Revenue for conformal EMI surface area coated via sputtering
3.3.4.10-year forecast: Revenue for conformal EMI surface area coated via spraying/printing
3.3.5.10-year forecast: Revenue for conformal EMI surface area coated with flake-based inks
3.3.6.10-year forecast: Revenue for conformal EMI surface area coated with nanoparticle/hybrid inks
3.3.7.10-year forecast: Revenue for conformal EMI surface area coated with particle free inks
3.3.8.10-year forecast: Revenue for conformal EMI surface area coated via plating
4.DEPOSITION METHODS FOR PACKAGE LEVEL SHIELDING
4.1.Overview
4.1.1.Variety of deposition methods for package-level EMI shielding materials
4.1.2.Comparison of sputtering and spraying
4.1.3.Uneven top/side deposition thicknesses create additional material requirements
4.2.Sputtering for EMI shielding
4.2.1.Introduction to sputtering
4.2.2.Sputtering via physical vapor deposition (PVD) workflow
4.2.3.Sputtering equipment innovation to improve package side deposition
4.2.4.Value chain for package-level EMI shielding with sputtering
4.2.5.Supplier details confirm that sputtering is the dominant approach
4.2.6.Sputtering for EMI shielding: SWOT analysis
4.2.7.Conclusions: Sputtering for package-level EMI shielding
4.3.Spraying/printing for EMI shielding
4.3.1.Spraying EMI shielding: A cost effective solution
4.3.2.Value chain for package-level shielding
4.3.3.Process flow for competing printing methods
4.3.4.Tilted spray coating offers even coverage across top surface and sidewalls
4.3.5.'Nozzle-less' ultrasonic spray system reduces potential concerns
4.3.6.Alternative business models for spraying/printing
4.3.7.Example spray machines used in conformal EMI shielding
4.3.8.Heraeus inkjet printing solution enables selective deposition
4.3.9.Key trend for EMI shielding: Compartmentalization of complex packages
4.3.10.Challenges with spraying EMI shielding coatings
4.3.11.Spray coated EMI Shielding: Particle size and morphology choice
4.3.12.Compartmental shielding through trench filling
4.3.13.Suppliers targeting ink-based conformal EMI shielding
4.3.14.Aerosol printing will enable selective deposition with high resolution
4.3.15.Aerosol printing mechanism
4.3.16.Spraying/printing for EMI shielding: SWOT analysis
4.3.17.Conclusions: Spraying/printing for package-level EMI shielding
4.4.Other deposition methods
4.4.1.Other deposition methods for package-level EMI shielding
4.4.2.Laser direct structuring (electroless plating) for antennas, circuitry, and EMI shielding.
4.4.3.Wire bonding for EMI shielding
4.4.4.Utilizing 'bond via array' for EMI shielding
4.4.5.Fully 3D printed electronics process steps
4.4.6.3D electronics enables co-axial shielding
4.4.7.AME antennas in packages for 5G wireless devices
4.4.8.Alternative deposition methods for EMI shielding: SWOT analysis
4.4.9.Conclusions: Other deposition methods for package-level EMI shielding
5.MATERIALS FOR EMI SHIELDING
5.1.Overview
5.1.1.Materials for package-level EMI shielding
5.1.2.What materials are used for EMI shielding?
5.2.Materials for board level shielding
5.2.1.Conventional EMI shielding materials
5.2.2.Larger scale EMI shielding: Making thermoplastics conductive
5.2.3.Metal cans - comparison of metal choices
5.2.4.Coated conductive plastics - high capital investment
5.2.5.Conductive filler - the economical approach
5.2.6.Conductive filler: Polymer material influences shielding effectiveness
5.2.7.Conclusions: Materials for board level shielding
5.3.Materials for sputtering
5.3.1.Materials for conformal sputtering
5.3.2.Shielding effectiveness of common sputtering materials
5.3.3.Multilayer EMI shielding stacks utilize interference to increase shielding effectiveness.
5.4.Metallic conductive Inks
5.4.1.Introduction: Metallic conductive inks for EMI shielding
5.4.2.Conductive ink requirements for EMI shielding
5.4.3.Requirements of conductive inks for conformal and compartmental EMI shielding
5.4.4.Specifications of conductive inks marketed at EMI shielding
5.4.5.Silver flakes dominate conductive ink market
5.4.6.Silver price volatility could affect ink composition
5.4.7.Thinner flakes improve shield conductivity and durability
5.4.8.Heraeus' inkjet printed particle-free Ag inks
5.4.9.Nanotech Energy has stopped its production EMI shielding materials - why?
5.4.10.SWOT analysis: Flake-based inks for EMI shielding
5.4.11.Overview of selected flake ink manufacturers for EMI shielding
5.4.12.Conductive nanoparticles can enable higher conductivity than flakes
5.4.13.Price competitiveness of silver nanoparticles
5.4.14.Using hybrid inks improves shielding performance
5.4.15.Ink for EMI shielding supplier: Duksan
5.4.16.Ink-based EMI shielding suppliers: Ntrium
5.4.17.Ink-based EMI shielding suppliers: Clariant
5.4.18.Ink-based EMI shielding suppliers: Fujikura Kasei
5.4.19.SWOT analysis: Nanoparticle inks for EMI shielding
5.4.20.Overview of selected nanoparticle ink manufacturers for EMI shielding
5.4.21.EMI shielding with particle-free inks
5.4.22.Conductivity of particle-free silver inks close to bulk metals
5.4.23.Particle size and morphology influence EMI shielding
5.4.24.SWOT analysis: Particle-free inks for EMI shielding
5.4.25.Overview of particle-free ink manufacturers for EMI shielding
5.4.26.Particle-free / molecular inks adopted for EMI shielding
5.4.27.Comparing metallic inks for EMI shielding
5.4.28.Metallic inks: SWOT analysis
5.4.29.Conclusions: Metallic inks for EMI shielding
5.5.Nanocarbon-based materials
5.5.1.CNTs for EMI shielding
5.5.2.Silicone with CNT additives as a shielding material
5.5.3.High frequency EMI shielding with CNTs
5.5.4.Early CNT yarn applications
5.5.5.Shielding effectiveness of nanocarbon composites
5.5.6.Loading density and percolation thresholds for graphene composites for EMI
5.5.7.Technology adoption for electrostatic discharge of composites
5.5.8.Conclusions: Nanocarbon-based materials for EMI shielding
5.6.Metamaterials
5.6.1.Introduction: Metamaterials for EMI shielding
5.6.2.Value proposition of metamaterials for EMI shielding
5.6.3.Metamaterials - how do they work?
5.6.4.Commercial opportunities against value proposition of metamaterials in EMI shielding
5.6.5.Meta Materials Inc develop rolling mask lithography
5.6.6.Rolling mask lithography: Advantages and disadvantages
5.6.7.Transparent EMI shielding with metamaterials
5.6.8.Transparent EMI shielding in microwave ovens
5.6.9.Niche availability may deter consumers
5.6.10.Metamaterials: SWOT analysis
5.6.11.Conclusions: Metamaterials for EMI shielding
5.7.MXenes
5.7.1.MXenes - a novel material promising for conformal EMI shielding
5.7.2.Introduction: MXenes for EMI shielding
5.7.3.Value propositions of MXenes for EMI shielding
5.7.4.MXene composition effects shielding effectiveness
5.7.5.MXene processing conditions influence shielding effectiveness
5.7.6.Scalable batch production of MXenes
5.7.7.Early stage development of MXenes
5.7.8.MXenes: SWOT analysis
5.7.9.Conclusions: MXenes for EMI shielding
5.8.Thermal interface materials with EMI shielding properties
5.8.1.Introduction: EMI shielding via thermal interface materials (TIMs)
5.8.2.Considerations for using TIMs for EMI shielding
5.8.3.TIMs for EMI shielding for ADAS radars
5.8.4.Density and thermal conductivity of TIMs for radar
5.8.5.Conclusions: Combined EMI/TIMs
6.APPLICATION SECTORS FOR EMI SHIELDING
6.1.Overview
6.1.1.Application sectors for conformal EMI shielding
6.2.Application specific trends and considerations
6.2.1.System-in-package architecture with integrated EMI shielding for 5G
6.2.2.System-in-package enabling technologies for mobile
6.2.3.Achieving AR/VR/MR device compactness requires conformal package level EMI shielding
6.2.4.EMI shielding for MEMS sensor packages
6.2.5.EMI shielding for leadframe packages in automotive electronics (I)
6.2.6.EMI shielding for leadframe packages in automotive electronics (II)
6.3.EMI shielding deployment examples
6.3.1.Laptop deployment example: MacBook Air M2
6.3.2.Laptop deployment example: Microsoft Surface 3
6.3.3.Smartwatch deployment example: Apple Watch Series 1 and Series 8 Ultra
6.3.4.Smartwatch deployment example: Samsung Galaxy Watch 4
6.3.5.Smartwatch deployment example: Apple iPhone X
6.3.6.Smartphone deployment example: Conformal shielding in Apple iPhone 12
6.3.7.Smartphone deployment example: Samsung Galaxy S23
6.3.8.Tablet deployment example: Apple iPad Air 8
6.3.9.5G infrastructure deployment example: Intel and Ericsson 28 GHz All-silicon 64 Dual Polarized Antenna
 

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Report Statistics

Slides 224
Forecasts to 2034
ISBN 9781915514882
 

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