Windlift

Windlift

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2021
19 Jan 2021

6G Communications Market, Devices, Materials 2021-2041

IDTechEx Report: Dr James Edmondson
2020
26 Feb 2020

Significance of Alphabet Exiting Giant Drones Including AWE

Significance of Alphabet Exiting Giant Drones Including Airborne Wind Energy. Alphabet/ Google and Facebook exiting large drones does not mean such aircraft are a failure. In Alphabet, a sister company of Google, was acquisition Makani in California and later Hawaii trialling a huge drone with eight propeller-generators and a 70 meter wingspan.
2019
15 Aug 2019

Military Vehicles on Land

The need for electric vehicles in military applications is strong. The speed of advance of an army is still limited by speed of providing fuel and other "materiel" as they call it. 20% of deaths are suffered simply providing fuel. The US Military has a program to reduce fuel consumption by 70% because of this.
2018
1 Oct 2018

Diesel Generator Set Future Developments and Alternative Technologies 2019-2029

IDTechEx Report:
11 Sep 2018

Windlift

Windlift is an engineering and computer programming company based in North Carolina. The company develops technology for Airborne Wind Energy (AWE).
3 Sep 2018

Airborne Wind Energy 2018 Survey Results and Forecast

AWE should be seen as part of a bigger picture. The next generation of zero emission electricity producing technologies has no huge steel and concrete infrastructure, so it can have much less cost and installation time and making it redeployable.
2017
10 Oct 2017

Commercialisation of AWE

Some findings from the new IDTechEx report, "Airborne Wind Energy 2017-2027"
28 Mar 2017

Airborne Wind Energy: sophisticated technology, primitive marketing

The technology of Airborne Wind Energy AWE has progressed in leaps and bounds recently as many developers prepare to sell them.
7 Mar 2017

Kite power: Diesel killer or wind turbine killer?

The new IDTechEx report, "Airborne Wind Energy (AWE) 2017-2027" finds that making electricity by flying kites and the like can potentially address two very different opportunities: kill diesel or kill wind turbines.