Latest developments in printed sensors (Intelligent and Smart Packaging 2005)

Dr Bruce Kahn, Assistant Professor
Rochester Institute of Technology, United States
 
 

Summary

  • Using innovative print technology to create condition sensing packaging technology
  • How do the sensors work
  • Current and future applications

Company Profile

Internationally recognized as a world leader in career-oriented and professional education, Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) has been setting an innovative standard since 1829. RIT enrolls more than 15,000 full- and part-time undergraduate and graduate students in 360 career-oriented programs. RIT's cooperative education program is the fourth oldest and one of the largest in the world, giving students hands-on, paid work experiences in key industries.
 
RIT's eight colleges cover a broad range of disciplines, with particular renown in imaging, computing and information sciences, photography, design and art, engineering, and education of the deaf. RIT offers the nation's first undergraduate programs in software engineering, information technology, and microelectronic engineering and the world's only Ph.D. program in imaging science. RIT has also been at the forefront in distance learning technology for individuals and its corporate partners.
 
U.S. News and World Report's poll of college presidents has consistently ranked RIT as one of the nation's leading comprehensive universities. In 2002, RIT ranked fifth among the top regional universities in the north and tied for first in academic reputation. Yahoo! Internet Life ranks RIT among its top 20 universities for wireless access.
 
Rochester Institute of Technology — the university of choice in a technological world.

Speaker CV

Dr Kahn's current research focus is the multi-disciplinary field of Printable Electronics. The general goal of this research is to investigate, assess, and develop the use of high volume printing techniques and materials for the fabrication of electronic devices. This work has produced (both small and production scale) and characterized antennas for Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags. A number of different printing techniques have been used to assess the process capabilities for printing conductive traces. High volume printing techniques are being used to print chemical sensors. Dr. Kahn's group is also interested in other techniques for patterning functional organic materials, such as MicroPen and laser transfer techniques. Dr Kahn teaches courses on various aspects of imaging technology and materials science, including Photographic Chemistry, Photographic Optics, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Lenticular Imaging, etc.
 
Dr. Kahn received his Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of Nebraska, and S.B. in Chemistry from the University of Chicago. Prior to joining the faculty of RIT, he was a Senior Research Scientist at the Eastman Kodak Company in Rochester, NY.

Speaker Biography (Bruce Kahn)

Dr. Kahn is a consultant specializing in the multidisciplinary fields of printed electronics, organic electronics, nanotechnology, smart packaging, and Radio Frequency Identification (RFID). In addition to helping companies and governmental organizations, he writes books, articles and reports, and conducts training sessions and workshops.
 
Prior to founding Printed Electronics consulting, Dr. Kahn was a Professor at the Rochester Institute of Technology, where he started the Printable Electronics research program. Dr. Kahn's research group pursued the investigation, assessment, and development of the use of printing techniques (particularly high volume printing processes) and materials for the fabrication of electronic devices. Their work produced (both small and production scale) and characterized antennas for Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags, and assessed the process capabilities of a number of different printing techniques used for patterning conductive features. Dr. Kahn has developed and applied technology for printing chemical sensors. His group printed RFID antennas directly onto corrugated cardboard substrates, and investigated the affects of environment and conditioning on the electrical conductivity. Dr. Kahn is currently investigating other techniques for patterning functional organic materials, such as liquid dispensing, and has created working organic transistors using this technique.
 
Dr. Kahn has a Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of Nebraska, and a S. B. in Chemistry from the University of Chicago. He is the author of over 75 publications, including the recently published books Developments in Printable Organic Transistors, published by Intertech-Pira, and Printed and Thin Film Photovoltaics and Batteries, published by in 2007 by IDTechEx. He is a frequent lecturer and author, and regularly teaches workshops in the US and abroad.