Chat with us, powered by LiveChat Materials for Printed/Flexible Electronics 2021-2031: Technologies, Applications, Market Forecasts: IDTechEx

Materials for Printed/Flexible Electronics 2021-2031: Technologies, Applications, Market Forecasts: IDTechEx

The printed electronic materials market is forecast to reach $6.9Bn by 2031

Materials for Printed/Flexible Electronics 2021-2031: Technologies, Applications, Market Forecasts

Materials for organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), photovoltaics (OPV), thin film transistors (OTFTs), photodetectors (OPDs). Also carbon nanotubes, perovskites, quantum dots, functional inorganic inks, component attachment materials, conductive inks.


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This IDTechEx Research report provides an extensive overview of the wide range of materials for both existing and emerging printed/flexible electronics applications. Innovative materials are a key enabling component of many printed/flexible electronics devices and range from organic semiconductors to quantum dots and from carbon nanotubes to conductive adhesives. By profiling multiple companies, we map the commercial adoption prospects and challenges for each material class and develop granular 10-year market forecasts that span both material types and applications.
 
IDTechEx has been researching the emerging printed electronics market since 2002. We have an unparalleled network of contacts throughout the printed/flexible electronics industry, enabling us to stay up-to-date with the technical and market developments. Many of these contacts in the materials space have been interviewed for this report, which builds on our masterclasses and workshops on 'materials for printed electronics'.
 
Functional materials are obviously a fundamental part of the value chain for any emerging technology, but this is especially true of printed/flexible electronics since the materials need to combine electronic/semiconducting functionality with being flexible and/or solution processable as well as being stable and straight-forward to manufacture. This can be a significant technical challenge, leading to widespread innovation in materials development across both established and early stage companies.
 
This report covers a wide range of materials for printed and flexible electronics, thus spanning multiple applications. More specifically, it covers:
  • Materials for organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs)
  • Materials for organic photovoltaics (OPVs)
  • Materials for organic photodetectors (OPDs)
  • Materials for organic thin film transistors (OTFTs)
  • Carbon nanotubes (CNTs)
  • Semiconducting perovskites
  • Quantum dots
  • Functional inorganic inks
  • Component attachment materials, including isotropic/anisotropic conductive adhesives and low temperature solder.
  • Conductive inks, including stretchable/thermoformable, nanoparticle-based, particle-free and copper inks.
 
In total, IDTechEx Research finds that the market for specialized materials for printed/flexible electronics will reach $6.9Bn in 2031.
 
This report provides a comprehensive overview of all solution processable materials that are compatible with printed/flexible electronics, with an emphasis on the most interesting emerging technologies. We identify the dominant technical and market narratives across the printed/flexible electronics materials space. SWOT analysis is provided for each material class and for each profiled company, along with assessments of technological and commercial readiness.
 
Figure 1: Illustrative example showing our readiness level assessment for a range of materials for printed/flexible electronics and their applications.
Materials for organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs)
OLEDs are the big commercial success story of printed/flexible electronics and indeed organic semiconductors; OLED displays are now a $30 bn market. However, technology never stands still and there is consistently innovation in both the emissive and host materials. Notable trends are the transition to Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence (TADF) materials and especially TADF molecules paired with fluorescent emitters and the continual quest for greater color purity. As the emissive layers and molecular architectures become more complex, we also see increasing adoption of material informatics to accompany experimental research in the development cycle.
 
Materials for organic photovoltaics (OPVs)
One of the original target applications for organic semiconductors, organic photovoltaics (OPV) has struggled to compete with the falling prices of silicon solar panels and more recently research efforts have largely shifted to thin film perovskite PV. However, the recent transition from fullerene derivatives to non-fullerene acceptors have led to increased efficiency and stability for OPVs. Combined with their well-known attributes of a tunable absorption spectrum, light weight and compatibility with roll-to-roll manufacturing, this has led to a partial renaissance with accelerating adoption for niche applications such as semi-transparent, indoor and building-integrated photovoltaics.
 
Materials for organic photodetectors (OPDs)
Organic photodetectors are an emerging promising technology, since they enable both large area detectors and light detection at wavelengths greater than silicon. In terms of structure, OPDs are very similar to OPV devices, but optimized for spectral range and detectivity rather than power conversion efficiency. An especially promising approach is hybrid OPD-on-CMOS detectors, in which an OPD layer is used on a silicon readout circuit to extend the spectral sensitivity into the short-wave infra-red (SWIR) region. Such capabilities are very promising for machine vision in driver assistance/autonomous vehicles since long wavelength light is scattered less by dust and fog.
 
Materials for organic thin film transistors (OTFTs)
The prospect of printing integrated circuits using organic semiconductors has long been cited as the motivation for extensive research into these materials. However, despite multiple attempts to commercialize this technology it has proved very difficult to compete with silicon, ultimately leading to using silicon ICs with flexible/printed electronics - known as Flexible Hybrid Electronics. However, OTFTs are still viable as transistor backplanes for active matrix curved/flexible/foldable displays due to their more straightforward manufacturing. Indeed, we believe that OTFT backplanes can be deployed, albeit in a very limited capacity, in flexible electrophoretic e-readers.
 
Quantum dots
An alternative and fast-growing category of solution processable semiconductors is quantum dots (QDs). Regarding printable applications, quantum dots are currently used in color conversion/enhancement films to widen the color gamut of LCD displays, in the case of color conversion improve efficiency since light is re-emitted. This is commercially advantageous since LCD manufacturers are keen to differentiate what is now a largely commoditized product. Furthermore, quantum dots can also be used to sense photons in the short-wave infra-red spectral range, with hybrid QD-on-CMOS cameras now commercially available.
 
Perovskite materials
Arguably one of the most significant materials science discoveries of the last decade, organic/inorganic perovskites have demonstrated rapidly increasing photovoltaic (PV) efficiencies and are on the verge of commercialization with Oxford PV developing a multijunction silicon/perovskite tandem cell. While the perovskite active layer is generally synthesized in-situ, this requires very high-purity precursors, while devise require multiple specialized materials for charge transport layers. Although long term stability remains in question, perovskites could soon be used in LEDs and image sensors as well as photovoltaic, making this a technology to watch closely.
 
Carbon nanotubes
Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been known for many decades, but the moment of significant commercial growth is just approaching. Carbon nanotubes are very versatile, since they can be synthesized to be insulating, semiconducting or conducting, and produced in large quantities for bulk applications that to take advantage of their strength and thermal conductivity. Regarding the printable applications, transparent conductive films are a promising application. This involves combining CNTs with silver nanowires, which amongst other advantages improves conductivity for the same transparency as fewer silver nanowires are needed. Carbon nanotubes are also increasingly being deployed in printed sensors for parameters such as temperature, humidity, and even gases.
 
Component attachment materials
Alternatives to conventional SAC solder for component attachment are developing rapidly, with driving forces primarily a being a desire for lower processing temperatures to suit thermally fragile substrates such as PET, along with a need for more rapid processing and compatibility with fine I/O pitches. Material innovations include ultra-low temperature solder and field-aligned anisotropic conductive adhesives (ACA). Low temperature component attachment materials are especially important for the emerging manufacturing approach of flexible hybrid electronics (FHE) that aims to combine the desirable attributes of printed electronics with the capabilities of placed components.
 
Conductive inks
Conductive inks are one of the most developed markets in printed electronics, with screen-printed silver paste used to make conductive fingers on solar panels. However, there is still plenty of innovation in the sector, with the advent of particle-free, stretchable, and copper inks for applications as diverse as e-textiles and in-mold electronics (IME). We believe that IME offers scope for substantial growth, along with the emerging manufacturing approach of flexible hybrid electronics.
 
Solution processable inorganic materials
An emerging class of printable materials for electronic applications includes suspensions of inorganic materials. Inorganic nanocrystals, structured metal oxides and even functional LEDs can all be deposited from solution, enabling printing to be used as a manufacturing method for applications as diverse as lighting, temperature sensors and even memory. As materials develop additive manufacturing methods such as printing are likely to be increasing adopted across many applications, particularly where high-mix low-volume production is required.
 
Ten Year Market forecasts 2021-2031
Our detailed market forecasts cover each of the material categories outlined above, with breakdowns into further subcategories where relevant. Forecasts are provided in terms of both revenue and volume (in kg).
 
Figure 2: Condensed market forecast by revenue ($ millions) for the categories of materials for printed/flexible electronics covered in this report. Note that this is only an example - the report itself contains far more granular forecast considering the constituents of each category individually.
 
Materials for Printed/Flexible Electronics 2021-2031 provides a definitive assessment of this diverse and growing market. The market is enabled by specialized, functional materials and this report focuses on the material requirements, progress and opportunities. The technical analysis and interview-led approach brings the reader unbiased outlooks, benchmarking studies and player assessments across this diverse and expanding industry.
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Table of Contents
1.EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
1.1.Extensive and diverse opportunities in materials for printed and flexible electronics
1.2.Materials for printed/flexible electronics dominated by OLED materials and conductive inks
1.3.Growth forecast in quantum dots, component attachment materials, and perovskites.
1.4.Overall 10-year forecast - Material revenue ($ millions) by category (organic semiconductors (materials for OLED, OPV, OPD, OTFT), carbon nanotubes, perovskites, quantum dots, inorganic semiconductor inks, component attachment mat
1.5.Overall 10-year forecast - Material revenue ($ millions) by category (excluding OLEDs and conductive inks)
1.6.Overall 10-year forecast - Material revenue ($ millions) by category (data table).
1.7.Overall 10-year forecast - Material volume (kg) by category (organic semiconductors (materials for OLED, OPV, OPD, OTFT), carbon nanotubes, perovskites, quantum dots, inorganic semiconductor inks, component attachment materials, c
1.8.Overall 10-year forecast - Material volume (kg) by category (excluding conductive inks)
1.9.Overall 10-year forecast - Material volume (kg) by category (data table).
1.10.New OLED emission material approach nears commercialization.
1.11.Printed OLEDs are getting closer to commercialization
1.12.Non-fullerene acceptors support OPV renaissance for non-standard applications
1.13.OTFT materials target backplanes for LCD and electrophoretic displays
1.14.Substantial opportunities for OPD and QD materials in hybrid image sensing
1.15.Innovations in anisotropic conductive adhesives facilitate component attachment for flexible hybrid electronics (FHE).
1.16.Quantum dots promising for color enhancement/conversion
1.17.Perovskite based solar cells show rapid efficiency gains, and prospects of commercialization
1.18.Functional inorganic inks provide a stable and printable alternative to organic semiconductors
1.19.Carbon nanotubes seeing growth in transparent conductive films and printed sensors
1.20.Wearable electronics and e-textiles require stretchable conductors and component attachment methods
1.21.Flake-based conductive inks face headwind from innovations that reduce solar cell silver requirements
1.22.In-mold electronics requires thermoformable ink portfolios
1.23.Increased interest in particle-free conductive inks
2.INTRODUCTION
2.1.Printed/flexible/organic electronics market size
2.2.Description and analysis of the main technology components of printed, flexible and organic electronics
2.3.Market potential and profitability
2.4.Route to market strategies: Pros and Cons
2.5.Printed/flexible electronics value chain is unbalanced
2.6.Many manufacturers now provide complete solutions
2.7.Many printed electronic technologies are an enabler but not an obvious product
2.8.Fragmented market makes commercial adoption of innovative materials challenging
3.REVIEW OF PRINTING METHODS
3.1.Printed electronics offers ease of manufacturing
3.2.A brief overview of screen, slot-die, gravure and flexographic printing
3.3.A brief overview of digital printing methods
3.4.Towards roll to roll (R2R) printing
3.5.Electrohydrodynamic ultra high-resolution printing
4.ORGANIC SEMICONDUCTORS (MOLECULES AND POLYMERS)
4.1.1.Organic semiconductors: A short introduction
4.1.2.Organic semiconductors: Molecules vs polymers
4.1.3.Organic semiconductors: Advantages and disadvantages
4.1.4.Commercial applications of organic semiconductors
4.2.OLED materials
4.2.1.OLEDs are a long standing commercial success
4.2.2.OLED vs LCD: Direct emission vs transmission
4.2.3.OLEDs are going flexible: market forecasts and trends
4.2.4.Motivations for OLED material development advancement.
4.2.5.Room at the top: Strategies to widen display color gamuts.
4.2.6.How do OLEDs work?
4.2.7.RGB vs White OLED
4.2.8.Fluorescent OLED materials
4.2.9.Phosphorescent OLED (PhOLED)
4.2.10.Common PHOLED materials
4.2.11.Evolution of materials in RGB OLED
4.2.12.Evolution of materials in WOLEDs
4.2.13.TADF: Next class of materials?
4.2.14.Motivation for TADF and hyperfluorescence
4.2.15.Latest results for TADF
4.2.16.Hybrid TADF + Fluorescence OLED (Hyperfluorescence)
4.2.17.Hyper fluorescence adoption prediction
4.2.18.General material comparison
4.2.19.How are the materials deposited today?
4.2.20.Fine metal mask limits scale, material utilization and PPI
4.2.21.Inkjet printing OLED displays
4.2.22.Inkjet printed RGB OLEDs target large area applications
4.2.23.Supplier landscape
4.2.24.Performance of solution process vs VTE: lifetime
4.2.25.Organic Vapor Jet Deposition (OVJD)
4.2.26.Performance of OVJD
4.2.27.OLED photolithography: the need?
4.2.28.OLED lighting is more challenging to commercialize than displays
4.2.29.Cost challenge set by the incumbent (inorganic LEDs)
4.2.30.Readiness level of OLED emissive materials
4.2.31.SWOT analysis: OLED materials
4.2.32.10-year forecasts for OLED materials by revenue ($ millions) and volume (kg) (fluorescent/ phosphorescent/TADF/ hyperfluorescent emitters, host materials)
4.2.33.10-year forecasts for OLED materials by revenue ($ millions) and volume (kg) (data table)
4.2.34.Company profiles: OLED materials
4.2.35.Company profile: Kyulux
4.2.36.SWOT analysis: Kyulux
4.2.37.Company profile: Cynora
4.2.38.SWOT analysis: Cynora
4.2.39.Company profile: Amber Molecular
4.2.40.SWOT analysis: Amber Molecular
4.2.41.Company profile: Molecular Glasses
4.2.42.SWOT analysis: Molecular Glasses
4.2.43.Company profile: Noctiluca
4.2.44.SWOT analysis: Noctiluca
4.2.45.Company profile: Universal Display Corporation (UDC)
4.2.46.SWOT analysis: Universal display corporation (UDC)
4.2.47.Company profile: Eternal Material Technology
4.2.48.SWOT analysis: Eternal Material Technology
4.2.49.Company profile: OLEDWorks
4.2.50.SWOT analysis: OLEDWorks
4.3.Organic photovoltaic (OPV) materials
4.3.1.Organic photovoltaics (OPV): A short introduction
4.3.2.Types of OPV materials
4.3.3.Non-fullerene acceptors: A renaissance for OPV?
4.3.4.Benefits of non-fullerene acceptors (NFAs)
4.3.5.Examples of non-fullerene acceptors (NFAs)
4.3.6.Tuneable bandgaps make OPV well suited to niche applications
4.3.7.Readiness level of OPV materials and applications
4.3.8.Comparison of OPV material companies
4.3.9.SWOT analysis: OPV materials
4.3.10.10-year forecasts for OPV materials by revenue ($ millions) and volume (kg) (non-fullerene acceptors, small polymer donors, donor polymers, fullerene derivatives)
4.3.11.10-year forecasts for OPV materials by revenue ($ millions) and volume (kg) (data table)
4.3.12.Company profiles: Organic photovoltaic materials
4.3.13.Company profile: Brilliant Matters
4.3.14.SWOT analysis: Brilliant Matters
4.3.15.Company profile: Raynergy Tek
4.3.16.SWOT analysis: Raynergy Tek
4.3.17.Company profile: Sunew
4.3.18.SWOT analysis: Sunew
4.3.19.Company profile: Epishine
4.3.20.SWOT analysis: Epishine
4.4.Organic photodetector (OPD) materials
4.4.1.Organic photodetectors: A short introduction
4.4.2.Types of printed photodetectors/image sensors
4.4.3.Photodetector working principles
4.4.4.Organic photodetectors (OPDs)
4.4.5.OPDs: Advantages and disadvantages
4.4.6.Manipulating the detection wavelength
4.4.7.What can you do with organic photodetectors?
4.4.8.Readiness level of OPD and hybrid image sensor applications
4.4.9.SWOT analysis: OPD materials
4.4.10.10-year forecast for OPD materials by revenue ($ millions) and volume (kg) (non-fullerene acceptors, donor polymers, fullerene derivatives)
4.4.11.10-year forecasts for OPD materials by revenue ($ millions) and volume (kg) (data table)
4.4.12.Company profiles: Organic photodetector materials
4.4.13.Company profile: ISORG
4.4.14.SWOT analysis: ISORG
4.5.Organic thin film transistor (OTFT) materials
4.5.1.Introduction to flexible logic and memory
4.5.2.Mediocre TFTs still have many functions
4.5.3.Printed TFTs aimed to enable simpler processing
4.5.4.Technical challenges in printing thin film transistors
4.5.5.Printed logic for RFID
4.5.6.TFT architecture
4.5.7.Organic semiconductors for TFTs
4.5.8.Organic transistor materials
4.5.9.OTFT mobility overestimation
4.5.10.Merck's Organic TFT materials
4.5.11.Commercial difficulties with printed transistors
4.5.12.OTFT materials companies adopt a portfolio approach
4.5.13.Comparison of TFT material properties
4.5.14.OTFT applications: OLCDs
4.5.15.OTFT applications: Electrophoretic displays
4.5.16.SWOT analysis: OTFT materials
4.5.17.Comparison of OTFT materials companies
4.5.18.Readiness level of OTFT applications
4.5.19.10-year forecast for OTFT materials by revenue (millions $) and volume (kg) (organic semiconductors, other OTFT materials)
4.5.20.10-year forecasts for OTFT materials by revenue ($ millions) and volume (kg) (data table)
4.5.21.Company profiles: Organic thin film transistor materials
4.5.22.Company profile: FlexEnable
4.5.23.SWOT analysis: FlexEnable
4.5.24.Company profile: Flexterra
4.5.25.SWOT analysis: Flexterra
4.5.26.Company profile: SmartKem
4.5.27.SWOT analysis: SmartKem
4.5.28.Company profile: NeuDrive
4.5.29.SWOT analysis: NeuDrive
5.CARBON NANOTUBES
5.1.Introduction to carbon nanotubes (CNTs)
5.2.CNTs: ideal vs reality
5.3.Key news stories and market progressions
5.4.Not all CNTs are equal
5.5.Price position of CNTs (from SWCNT to FWCNT to MWCNT)
5.6.Price evolution: past, present and future (MWCNTs)
5.7.Production capacity of CNTs globally
5.8.Progression and outlook for capacity
5.9.CNTs: value proposition as an additive material
5.10.Combustion synthesis of CNTs (Nano-C)
5.11.Fully printed ICs for RFID using CNTs (Toray)
5.12.CNT:AgNW hybrid transparent conductive films (Chasm Advanced Materials)
5.13.Readiness level of all CNT applications in printed electronics
5.14.SWOT analysis: Carbon nanotubes (for printed electronics)
5.15.10-year forecast for CNT materials (single walled carbon nanotubes) by revenue ($ millions) and volume (kg)
5.16.10-year forecasts for OTFT materials by revenue ($ millions) and volume (kg) (data table)
5.17.Company profiles: Carbon nanotubes within printed electronics
5.18.Company profile: Nano-C
5.19.SWOT analysis: Nano-C
5.20.Company profile: Chasm Advanced Materials
5.21.SWOT analysis: Chasm Advanced Materials
5.22.Related report: Carbon Nanotubes
5.23.Related report: Transparent conductive films
6.SEMICONDUCTING PEROVSKITE MATERIALS
6.1.Hybrid perovskites: A short introduction
6.2.Rapid efficiency gains propel perovskites to prominence
6.3.Perovskite crystal structure
6.4.Working principle of perovskite solar cells
6.5.Structures/architectures of perovskite solar cells
6.6.Perovskite solar cell development timeline
6.7.Material combinations
6.8.All-inorganic perovskite solar cells
6.9.Perovskite bandgap tuning by varying halide composition.
6.10.Bandgap and tolerance factor of halide perovskite and corresponding PV parameters
6.11.Possible material improvement for perovskite solar cells
6.12.Interface layers for perovskite solar cells
6.13.Polymer hole transport materials (HTMs)
6.14.Small molecule HTMs based on phenylamine derivatives
6.15.Small molecule HTMs without phenylamine derivatives
6.16.Readiness level of perovskite applications
6.17.Comparison of perovskite precursor material companies
6.18.SWOT analysis: Perovskites
6.19.10-year forecast for semiconducting perovskite materials by revenue ($ millions) and volume (kg)
6.20.10-year forecasts for OTFT materials by revenue ($ and volume (data table)
6.21.Company profiles: Perovskites
6.22.Company profile: GreatCell Solar Materials
6.23.SWOT Analysis: Greatcell Solar Materials
6.24.Company profile: Oxford PV
6.25.SWOT Analysis: Oxford PV
6.26.Related report: Perovskite Photovoltaics 2018-2028
7.QUANTUM DOTS
7.1.Quantum dots as optical sensor materials
7.2.Lead sulphide as quantum dots
7.3.Quantum dots: Choice of the material system
7.4.Perovskite quantum dots for color enhancement/conversion (I)
7.5.Perovskite quantum dots for color enhancement/conversion (II)
7.6.Applications and challenges for quantum dots in image sensors
7.7.QD layer advantage in image sensor (I): Increasing sensor sensitivity and gain
7.8.QD Technology and Market Roadmap (10 year view)
7.9.Readiness level of QD applications
7.10.SWOT analysis: Quantum dots
7.11.10-year forecast for quantum dots for printed/flexible electronics applications by revenue ($ millions) and volume (kg)
7.12.10-year forecasts for OTFT materials by revenue ($ and volume (data table)
7.13.Company profiles: Quantum Dots
7.14.Company profile: Nanosys
7.15.Company profile: NanoLumi
7.16.SWOT analysis: Nanolumi
7.17.Company profile: Helio
7.18.SWOT analysis: Helio
7.19.Company profile: TCL
7.20.Company profile: Nanoco
7.21.Related report: Quantum dots
8.FUNCTIONAL INORGANIC INKS
8.1.Introduction: Functional inorganic inks
8.2.Printed LED lighting (NthDegree)
8.3.Printed memory from nanocube inks (Australian Advanced Materials)
8.4.Inorganic piezoelectric ink (Meggit)
8.5.Silicon nanoparticle ink for temperature sensing (PST Sensors) (II)
8.6.ITO nanoparticle based transparent conductive ink (Mateprincs)
8.7.Comparison of inorganic semiconductor ink companies
8.8.Readiness assessment of functional inorganic inks
8.9.SWOT analysis: Functional inorganic inks
8.10.10-year forecast for functional inorganic inks (silicon nanocrystals, layered metal oxide nanocrystals, printable LEDs, inorganic piezoelectric ink, ITO nanocrystals) by revenue ($ millions) and volume (kg)
8.11.10-year forecast for functional inorganic inks by revenue ($ millions) and volume (kg) (data table)
8.12.Company profiles: Functional inorganic inks
8.13.Company profile: PST Sensors
8.14.SWOT analysis: PST Sensors
8.15.Company profile: NthDegree
8.16.SWOT analysis: NthDegree
8.17.Company profile: Australian Advanced Materials
8.18.SWOT analysis: Australian Advanced Materials
8.19.Company profile: Meggit (Piezopaint)
8.20.SWOT analysis: Meggit (Piezopaint)
8.21.Company profile: Mateprincs
8.22.SWOT analysis: Meggit (Piezopaint)
8.23.Related report: Printed sensors
9.COMPONENT ATTACHMENT MATERIALS
9.1.Introduction Component attachment materials
9.2.Differentiating factors: Component attachment materials
9.3.Comparing electrical component attachment materials
9.4.Substrate compatibility with existing infrastructure
9.5.Electrically conductive adhesives: Two different approaches
9.6.Example of conductive adhesives on flexible substrates
9.7.Magnetically aligned ACA (Sunray Scientific)
9.8.Electrically aligned ACF (CondAlign)
9.9.Self-assembled anisotropic conductive adhesive (Nopion)
9.10.Thermoformable isotropic conductive adhesives
9.11.Solder facilitates rapid component assembly via self alignment
9.12.Low temperature solder enables thermally fragile substrates
9.13.Low temperature solder alloys
9.14.Low temperature soldering with core-shell nanoparticles (Safi-Tech)
9.15.Supercooled liquid solder (Safi-Tech)
9.16.Readiness level: Component attachment materials
9.17.Component attachment materials roadmap
9.18.Company overview: Component attachment materials
9.19.10-year forecast for component attachment materials (ultra low temperature solder, isotropic conductive adhesives, conventional ACA, field-aligned ACA) by revenue ($ millions) and volume (kg).
9.20.10-year forecast for component attachment materials by revenue ($ millions) and volume (data table)
9.21.Company profiles: Component attachment materials
9.22.Company profile: CondAlign
9.23.SWOT analysis: CondAlign
9.24.Company profile: Sunray Scientific
9.25.SWOT analysis: Sunray Scientific
9.26.SWOT analysis: Nopion
9.27.Company profile: Safi-Tech
9.28.SWOT analysis: CondAlign
9.29.Company profile: Alpha Assembly
9.30.SWOT analysis: Alpha Assembly
9.31.Related report: Flexible hybrid electronics
10.CONDUCTIVE INKS
10.1.1.Introduction: Conductive inks
10.1.2.Readiness level of component inks
10.1.3.10-year forecast for conductive inks (flake-based silver, nanoparticle-based silver, particle-free ink, copper ink, stretchable ink, thermo-formable ink, metal-gel based ink) by revenue ($ millions) and volume (kg)
10.1.4.10-year forecast for conductive inks excluding flake-based silver (nanoparticle-based silver, particle-free ink, copper ink, stretchable ink, thermo-formable ink, metal-gel based ink) by revenue ($ millions) and volume (kg)
10.1.5.10-year forecast for conductive inks by revenue ($ millions) (data table)
10.1.6.10-year forecast for conductive inks by volume (kg) (data table)
10.1.7.Related report: Conductive inks
10.2.Flake-based conductive inks
10.2.1.Particle morphology evolution: From spherical to flat flakes
10.2.2.Performance level of fired and cured traditional pastes/inks across various applications
10.2.3.Value chain for conductive pastes
10.2.4.Flake-based conductive inks face headwind from alternative solar cell connection technology.
10.2.5.Smart wire connection technology reduces conductive ink requirements
10.2.6.SWOT analysis: Flake-based inks
10.2.7.Company profiles: Flake-based conductive inks
10.2.8.Company profile: Henkel
10.2.9.SWOT analysis: Henkel
10.3.Nanoparticle-based inks
10.3.1.Silver nanoparticle inks: key value propositions
10.3.2.Silver nanoparticle inks: higher conductivity
10.3.3.Silver nanoparticles: getting more with less
10.3.4.Performance of Ag nano inks and comparison with traditional inks
10.3.5.Other benefits of nanoparticle inks
10.3.6.Price competitiveness of silver nanoparticles
10.3.7.Silver nanoparticle production methods
10.3.8.Benchmarking different nanoparticle production processes
10.3.9.SWOT analysis: Nanoparticle-based inks
10.3.10.Company profiles: Nanoparticle-based inks
10.3.11.Company profile: PV Nano Cell
10.3.12.SWOT analysis: PV Nanocell
10.3.13.Company profile: GenesInk
10.3.14.SWOT analysis: GenesInk
10.4.Particle-free conductive inks
10.4.1.Particle free conductive inks and pastes
10.4.2.Particle-free inks for IME (E2IP)
10.4.3.SWOT analysis: Particle-free conductive inks
10.4.4.Company profiles: Particle free inks
10.4.5.Company profile: Heraeus
10.4.6.Company profile: Electroninks
10.4.7.SWOT analysis: Electroninks
10.4.8.Company profile: Liquid-X
10.4.9.SWOT analysis: Liquid-X
10.4.10.Company profile: E2IP
10.4.11.SWOT analysis: E2IP
10.5.Stretchable and thermoformable inks
10.5.1.New ink requirements: stretchability
10.5.2.Bridging the conductivity gap between printed electronics and IME inks
10.5.3.The role of particle size in stretchable inks
10.5.4.Elantas: selecting right fillers and binders to improve stretchability
10.5.5.New ink requirements: portfolio approach
10.5.6.Stretchable vs thermoformable conductive inks
10.5.7.Stretchable ink: strong supplier push
10.5.8.Stretchable and thermoformable electronics: Technology readiness
10.5.9.Innovations in stretchable conductive ink
10.5.10.Stretchable conductive inks: Room to innovate
10.5.11.Stretchable inks: products/prototypes on the rise
10.5.12.Stretchable inks: products/prototypes on the rise
10.5.13.What is in-mold electronics?
10.5.14.In mold electronics: Growth after previous false starts
10.5.15.High strain stretchable sensors
10.5.16.'Stretchable' sensors
10.5.17.Stretchable substrates or circuit boards
10.5.18.Early-stage stretchable electronic components
10.5.19.Metal gel as a stretchable ink (I) (Liquid Wire)
10.5.20.Metal gel as a stretchable ink (II) (Liquid Wire)
10.5.21.Liquid metal as a stretchable ink (III) (Liquid Wire)
10.5.22.SWOT analysis: Stretchable and thermoformable inks
10.5.23.Company profiles: Stretchable/thermoformable ink
10.5.24.Company profile: DuPont
10.5.25.SWOT analysis: DuPont
10.5.26.Company profile: Liquid Wire
10.5.27.SWOT analysis: Liquid wire
10.5.28.Company profile: Elantas
10.5.29.SWOT analysis: Elantas
10.6.Copper inks
10.6.1.Copprint: Copper inks with in-situ oxidation prevention
10.6.2.Asahi Kasei: Reducing cuprous oxide by sintering
10.6.3.Pricing strategy and performance of copper inks and pastes
10.6.4.Performance and key characteristics of copper inks and pastes offered by different companies
10.6.5.Company profile: Copper ink
10.6.6.Company profile: Copprint
10.6.7.SWOT analysis: Copprint
10.6.8.Company profile: PrintCB
10.6.9.SWOT analysis: PrintCB
11.MARKET FORECASTS
11.1.Forecasting methodology
11.2.Overall 10-year forecast - Material revenue ($ millions) by category (organic semiconductors (materials for OLED, OPV, OPD, OTFT), carbon nanotubes, perovskites, quantum dots, inorganic semiconductor inks, component attachment mat
11.3.Overall 10-year forecast - Material revenue ($ millions) by category (excluding OLEDs and conductive inks)
11.4.Overall 10-year forecast - Material revenue ($ millions) by category (data table).
11.5.Overall 10-year forecast - Material volume (kg) by category (organic semiconductors (materials for OLED, OPV, OPD, OTFT), carbon nanotubes, perovskites, quantum dots, inorganic semiconductor inks, component attachment materials, c
11.6.Overall 10-year forecast - Material volume (kg) by category (excluding conductive inks)
11.7.Overall 10-year forecast - Material volume (kg) by category (data table).
11.8.10-year forecasts for OLED materials by revenue ($ millions) and volume (kg) (fluorescent/ phosphorescent/TADF/ hyperfluorescent emitters, host materials)
11.9.10-year forecasts for OLED materials by revenue ($ millions) and volume (kg) (data table)
11.10.10-year forecasts for OPV materials by revenue ($ millions) and volume (kg) (non-fullerene acceptors, small polymer donors, donor polymers, fullerene derivatives)
11.11.10-year forecasts for OPV materials by revenue ($ millions) and volume (kg) (data table)
11.12.10-year forecast for OPD materials by revenue ($ millions) and volume (kg) (non-fullerene acceptors, donor polymers, fullerene derivatives)
11.13.10-year forecasts for OPD materials by revenue ($ millions) and volume (kg) (data table)
11.14.10-year forecast for OTFT materials by revenue (millions $) and volume (kg) (organic semiconductors, other OTFT materials)
11.15.10-year forecasts for OTFT materials by revenue ($ millions) and volume (kg) (data table)
11.16.10-year forecast for CNT materials (single walled carbon nanotubes) by revenue ($ millions) and volume (kg)
11.17.10-year forecasts for OTFT materials by revenue ($ millions) and volume (kg) (data table)
11.18.10-year forecast for semiconducting perovskite materials by revenue ($ millions) and volume (kg)
11.19.10-year forecasts for OTFT materials by revenue ($ and volume (data table)
11.20.10-year forecast for quantum dots for printed/flexible electronics applications by revenue ($ millions) and volume (kg)
11.21.10-year forecasts for OTFT materials by revenue ($ and volume (data table)
11.22.10-year forecast for functional inorganic inks (silicon nanocrystals, layered metal oxide nanocrystals, printable LEDs, inorganic piezoelectric ink, ITO nanocrystals) by revenue ($ millions) and volume (kg)
11.23.10-year forecast for functional inorganic inks by revenue ($ millions) and volume (kg) (data table)
11.24.10-year forecast for component attachment materials (ultra low temperature solder, isotropic conductive adhesives, conventional ACA, field-aligned ACA) by revenue ($ millions) and volume (kg).
11.25.10-year forecast for component attachment materials by revenue ($ millions) and volume (data table)
11.26.10-year forecast for conductive inks (flake-based silver, nanoparticle-based silver, particle-free ink, copper ink, stretchable ink, thermo-formable ink, metal-gel based ink) by revenue ($ millions) and volume (kg)
11.27.10-year forecast for conductive inks excluding flake-based silver (nanoparticle-based silver, particle-free ink, copper ink, stretchable ink, thermo-formable ink, metal-gel based ink) by revenue ($ millions) and volume (kg)
11.28.10-year forecast for conductive inks by revenue ($ millions) (data table)
11.29.10-year forecast for conductive inks by volume (kg) (data table)
 

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