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2020
7 Jul 2020

Researchers Print, Tune Graphene Sensors to Monitor Food Freshness

Researchers dipped their new, printed sensors into tuna broth and watched the readings. It turned out the sensors - printed with high-resolution aerosol jet printers on a flexible polymer film and tuned to test for histamine, an allergen and indicator of spoiled fish and meat - can detect histamine down to 3.41 parts per million.
6 Jul 2020

Shrimp Shells to Produce Electrodes for Large Storage Batteries

Researchers have developed a system to produce electrodes for vanadium flow batteries, used in renewable energy storage. The electrodes are made from chitin, a polysaccharide found in the exoskeleton of crustaceans and insects.
25 Jun 2020

Wearable Patch a New Treatment Option for Skin Cancer

Conventional melanoma therapies, including chemotherapy and radiotherapy, suffer from the toxicity and side effects of repeated treatments due to the aggressive and recurrent nature of melanoma cells.
19 Jun 2020

Synthetic Red Blood Cells Mimic Natural Ones, Have New Abilities

Scientists have tried to develop synthetic red blood cells that mimic the favorable properties of natural ones, such as flexibility, oxygen transport and long circulation times. Now, researchers have made synthetic red blood cells that have all of the cells' natural abilities, plus a few new ones.
12 Jun 2020

Making 4D Printing More Practical

Soft robots and biomedical implants that reconfigure themselves upon demand are closer to reality with a new way to print shapeshifting materials.
10 Jun 2020

New Material, Modeling Methods Promise Advances in Energy Storage

The explosion of mobile electronic devices, electric vehicles, drones and other technologies have driven demand for new lightweight materials that can provide the power to operate them. Researchers have reported a structural supercapacitor electrode made from reduced graphene oxide and aramid nanofiber that is stronger and more versatile than conventional carbon-based electrodes.
8 Jun 2020

A Viable Sodium Battery

Researchers have created a sodium-ion battery that holds as much energy and works as well as some commercial lithium-ion battery chemistries, making for a potentially viable battery technology out of abundant and cheap materials.
20 May 2020

Controlling Cells with Light

Photopharmacology investigates the use of light to switch the effect of drugs on and off. Now, for the first time, scientific teams have succeeded in using this method to control a component of cells that was previously considered inaccessible.
15 May 2020

Expandable Foam for 3D Printing Large Objects

It's a frustrating limitation of 3D printing: Printed objects must be smaller than the machine making them. Huge machines are impractical for printing large parts because they take up too much space and require excessive time to print. Now, a new material can be used to 3D print small objects that expand upon heating. The foam could find applications in architecture, aerospace and biomedicine.
7 May 2020

Graphene Biosensor Detects SARS-Co-V-2 in Under a Minute

According to many experts, early diagnosis and management are critical for slowing the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the new coronavirus that causes COVID-19. Therefore, the race is on to develop diagnostic tests for the virus that are faster, easier and more accurate than existing ones.
5 May 2020

Microwaves Power New Technology for Batteries, Energy

New battery technology involving microwaves may provide an avenue for renewable energy conversion and storage.
27 Apr 2020

New Textile Could Keep You Cool in the Heat, Warm in the Cold

Imagine a single garment that could adapt to changing weather conditions, keeping its wearer cool in the heat of midday but warm when an evening storm blows in. Now, researchers report a strong, comfortable fabric that heats and cools skin, with no energy input.
17 Apr 2020

DNA Biosensor for Early Stage Disease Detection

Disease detection at an early stage is one of the biggest challenges biochemists and materials scientists are trying to meet. Researchers used nanotechnology in biomedical diagnostics - a process called nanodiagnostics - to create a new, ultrasensitive DNA biosensor. The new sensor could potentially detect DNA-based biomarkers for early diagnosis of cancer and genetic disorders, as well as monitor patient responses to therapies.
16 Apr 2020

Scavenger Technology Allows Robots to Eat Metal for Energy

When electronics need their own power sources, there are two basic options: batteries and harvesters. Batteries store energy internally, but are therefore heavy and have a limited supply. Harvesters, such as solar panels, collect energy from their environments. This gets around some of the downsides of batteries but introduces new ones, in that they can only operate in certain conditions and can't turn that energy into useful power very quickly.
6 Apr 2020

World's First Ultrasound Biosensor

The ability to accurately monitor drug levels and biological molecules inside patients in real time has remained largely elusive. Most of the implantable monitors invented so far rely on high tech and expensive detectors such as CT scans or MRI. Using ultrasound - which is cheap and portable - as a means to track a disease state as in response of a tumour to a new drug or the risk of a heart attack with the rise of a diagnostic protein called troponin has always been more a Blue Sky than reality.
6 Apr 2020

Neural Networks Facilitate Optimization in Search for New Materials

When searching through theoretical lists of possible new materials for particular applications, such as batteries or other energy-related devices, there are often millions of potential materials that could be considered, and multiple criteria that need to be met and optimized at once. Now, researchers have found a way to dramatically streamline the discovery process, using a machine learning system.
30 Mar 2020

New Sensor Could Help Prevent Food Waste

As flowers bloom and fruits ripen, they emit a colorless, sweet-smelling gas called ethylene. Chemists have now created a tiny sensor that can detect this gas in concentrations as low as 15 parts per billion, which they believe could be useful in preventing food spoilage.
23 Mar 2020

Fish Scales Could Make Wearable Electronics More Sustainable

Flexible temporary electronic displays may one day make it possible to sport a glowing tattoo or check a reading, like that of a stopwatch, directly on the skin. In its current form, however, this technology generally depends on plastic. New research describes a way to make these displays, which would likely be discarded after a single use, more environmentally friendly using a plentiful and biodegradable resource: fish scales.
13 Mar 2020

New Material Could Turn Clothing into a Health Monitor

Researchers are reporting a new material, pliable enough to be woven into fabric but imbued with sensing capabilities that could serve as an early warning system for injury or illness.
12 Mar 2020

Micromotors get Supercharged

Someday, microscopic robots could perform useful functions, such as diagnostic testing in lab-on-a-chip sensors, micropatterning surfaces or repairing equipment in tight spaces. But first, scientists need to be able to tightly control the microbots' speed.