American Chemical Society

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2019
4 Nov

A Stretchable Stopwatch Lights Up Human Skin

Imagine a runner who doesn't need to carry a stopwatch or cell phone to check her time: She could just gaze at the glowing stopwatch display on the back of her hand. Such human-machine interfaces are no longer science fiction, but they still have a way to go before becoming mainstream. Now, researchers have developed a stretchable light-emitting device that operates at low voltages and is safe for human skin.
28 Oct

Pacifier Biosensor Could Help Monitor Newborn Health

Wearable biosensors that non-invasively monitor health and fitness are growing in popularity among adults. However, adapting this technology for use with babies is difficult, now researchers say they have developed a pacifier-based biosensor that tracks real-time glucose levels in saliva.
25 Oct

Efficient Electrochemical Energy Storage

The rapid development of electronic devices and power equipment, such as new-energy vehicles and robots, has sparked extensive demand for portable power sources. Electrochemical energy storage, mainly based on ionic intercalation/motion or adsorption/diffusion in electrodes, has been utilized in the last two centuries.
23 Oct

Spotlight on ACS Material

"You need a reliable source for highly advanced materials", ACS Materials will be exhibiting at The IDTechEx Show! November 20-21 2019, Santa Clara, CA.
23 Oct

Next-gen solar cells mimic photosynthesis with biological material

Next-generation solar cells that mimic photosynthesis with biological material may give new meaning to the term "green technology."
18 Oct

Graphene and carbon nanotubes combine into transparent hybrid material

Scientists have combined graphene and single-walled carbon nanotubes into a transparent hybrid material with conductivity higher than either component exhibits separately.
9 Oct

Bacteria trapped — and terminated — by graphene filter

Airborne bacteria may see what looks like a comfy shag carpet on which to settle. But it's a trap. Scientists have transformed their laser-induced graphene into self-sterilizing filters that grab pathogens out of the air and kill them with small pulses of electricity.
7 Oct

Printed electronics open way for electrified tattoos

The first demonstration of a fully print-in-place electronics technique is gentle enough to work on surfaces as delicate as human skin and paper.
19 Sep

Using machine learning to estimate risk of cardiovascular death

Humans are inherently risk-averse: We spend our days calculating routes and routines, taking precautionary measures to avoid disease, danger, and despair. Still, our measures for controlling the inner workings of our biology can be a little more unruly. With that in mind, a team from MIT's Computer Science and Artifi
17 Sep

A chameleon-inspired smart skin changes color in the sun

Researchers have taken a page from the chameleon's playbook to develop a flexible smart skin that changes its color in response to heat and sunlight.
16 Sep

Fuel cells developed using nanomaterials are cost effective, efficient

A fuel cell can be built from cheaper, more widely available metals using an atomic-level design that also gives the material long-term stability.
11 Sep

The Swiss Army Knife of gene editing gets new control

When researchers want to edit, activate, or silence a gene in any living organism, from bacteria to humans, they often turn to CRISPR/Cas9, a complex of RNA and protein that can act like a genetic Swiss Army Knife.
2 Sep

Protein batteries for safer, environmentally friendly power storage

Proteins are good for building muscle, but their building blocks also might be helpful for building sustainable organic batteries that could someday be a viable substitute for conventional lithium-ion batteries, without their safety and environmental concerns.
30 Aug

New study reveals carbon nanotubes measurement possible for the first

Scientists have reported a new approach to measuring the conductivity between identical carbon nanotubes which could be used to help improve the efficiency of electrical power cables in the future.
29 Aug

Skin patch could painlessly deliver vaccines, cancer meds, in a minute

Researchers have developed a fast-acting skin patch that efficiently delivers medication to attack melanoma cells. The device, tested in mice and human skin samples, is an advance toward developing a vaccine to treat melanoma and has widespread applications for other vaccines.
15 Aug

'Sniff-cam' to detect disease

Having bad breath can mean someone ate a smelly lunch, but it could indicate that the person is sick. Various scent compounds have been linked to illnesses such as diabetes, lung cancer and Parkinson's disease, leading scientists to develop technology that measures these substances. However, the challenge is creating instrumentation that can detect low, diagnostic levels of these disease biomarkers.
31 Jul

Energy from seawater

Salt is power. It might sound like alchemy, but the energy in places where salty ocean water and freshwater mingle could provide a massive source of renewable power. Researchers have developed an affordable, durable technology that could harness this so-called blue energy.
29 Jul

Artificial throat could someday help mute people 'speak'

Researchers have developed a wearable artificial throat that, when attached to the neck like a temporary tattoo, can transform throat movements into sounds.
15 Jul

New technique could brighten screens, make smartphone batteries last

Our future TV and smartphone screens could have double the energy efficiency, thanks to a technique invented by scientists.
15 Jul

Organic solar cells will last 10 years in space

Over the past two decades, organic solar cells have garnered much attention thanks to their light weight, flexibility and unprecedented energy-to-weight ratios of 10 to 20 W/g, which make them a promising candidate for space applications, although their radiation stability is still poorly