Ionic Materials

Ionic Materials

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2020
28 Jul 2020

Solid-State Batteries Will Create a $6 Billion Market in 2030

Solid-state batteries keep on attracting tremendous attention and investment with the maturing technologies and closeness to mass production.
12 Feb 2020

A Thermometer can be Stretched and Crumpled by Water

Recent outbreaks of the novel coronavirus have emphasized the importance of quarantine and prevention more than ever. When monitoring changes in our body, body temperature is first measured. So, it is very significant to measure the temperature accurately and promptly.
2019
29 May 2019

A Solid Future: New Opportunities enabled by Solid State Batteries

Solid state batteries have been considered as the avenue to the next generation energy storage solutions. According to IDTechEx's research "Solid-State and Polymer Batteries 2019-2029: Technology, Patents, Forecasts, Players" www.idtechex.com/solid.
2018
13 Aug 2018

Ionic Materials

Ionic Materials (IM) is a US-based start-up developing a solid polymer electrolyte for Li-ion batteries. Founded in 2011 by Mike Zimmerman, serial entrepreneur and professor at Tufts University, in 2018 the company raised $65M in a Series C funding round that included Hyundai, Renault-Nissan, A123 Systems, Total, and Hitachi Chemical, among other investors.
Included are:
19 Jul 2018

Volta Energy Technologies announces investment in Conamix

Volta Energy Technologies is investing in Conamix, a technology startup based in Ithaca, New York. Conamix has developed a breakthrough material and process for creating low-cost, high-energy, and cobalt-free electrode materials for lithium-based batteries.
12 Jul 2018

Hyundai invests to advance battery technology

Hyundai is investing in Ionic Materials to advance the development of battery technology and improve EV performance with solid-state battery innovation.
2015
1 Oct 2015

Single layer perovskite sheet rises to the fore

To the growing list of two-dimensional semiconductors, such as graphene, boron nitride, and molybdenum disulfide, whose unique electronic properties make them potential successors to silicon in future devices, you can now add hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites.