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Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

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Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

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Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), www.mit.edu, Cambridge, MA is the globally number 1 ranked institution of research and higher education (based on Quacquarelli Symonds ranking in 2012-2013), with over 25,000 existing spawn out companies that collectively employ 3.3 million people and generate over $2 trillion annually (equivalent of 11th largest economy in the world), according to a 2009 study by Kaufman Foundation
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2018
12 Oct

Route to flexible electronics made from exotic materials

Engineers have developed a technique to fabricate ultrathin semiconducting films made from a host of exotic materials other than silicon. To demonstrate their technique, the researchers fabricated flexible films made from gallium arsenide, gallium nitride, and lithium fluoride — materials that exhibit better performance than silicon but until now have been prohibitively expensive to produce in functional devices.
9 Oct

Model helps robots navigate more like humans do

When moving through a crowd to reach some end goal, humans can usually navigate the space safely without thinking too much. They can learn from the behavior of others and note any obstacles to avoid. Robots, on the other hand, struggle with such navigational concepts.
1 Oct

Machine-learning system tackles speech, object recognition at once

MIT computer scientists have developed a system that learns to identify objects within an image, based on a spoken description of the image. Given an image and an audio caption, the model will highlight in real-time the relevant regions of the image being described.
25 Sep

New battery gobbles up carbon dioxide

A new type of battery could be made partly from carbon dioxide captured from power plants. Rather than attempting to convert carbon dioxide to specialized chemicals using metal catalysts, which is currently highly challenging, this battery could continuously convert carbon dioxide into a solid mineral carbonate as it discharges.
24 Sep

New sensors track dopamine in the brain for more than a year

Neuroscientists have now devised a way to measure dopamine in the brain for more than a year, which they believe will help them to learn much more about its role in both healthy and diseased brains.
19 Sep

Imprint Energy new investments to advance ultrathin flexible batteries

Imprint Energy announced the successful completion of a $5 million investment round. Imprint has continued its progress toward commercialization. Multiple manufacturing partners have successfully printed Imprint batteries using their existing standard printing equipment, and Imprint batteries are moving into field trials of IoT products.
13 Sep

Model can more naturally detect depression in conversations

In recent years, machine learning has been championed as a useful aid for diagnostics. Machine-learning models, for instance, have been developed that can detect words and intonations of speech that may indicate depression.
12 Sep

Robots can now pick up any object after inspecting it

Humans have long been masters of dexterity, a skill that can largely be credited to the help of our eyes. Robots, meanwhile, are still catching up.
6 Sep

E Ink and Fujitsu Semiconductor join forces

E Ink Holdings and Fujitsu Semiconductor Limited announced the joint development of a reference design board for battery-less ePaper tags.
30 Aug

GPS for inside your body

Investigating inside the human body often requires cutting open a patient or swallowing long tubes with built-in cameras. But what if physicians could get a better glimpse in a less expensive, invasive, and time-consuming manner?
29 Aug

More efficient security for cloud-based machine learning

Novel combination of two encryption techniques protects private data, while keeping neural networks running quickly.
23 Aug

Building up stretchable electronics to be multipurpose as smartphones

By stacking and connecting layers of stretchable circuits on top of one another, engineers have developed an approach to build soft, pliable "3D stretchable electronics" that can pack a lot of functions while staying thin and small in size.
18 Aug

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

MIT has many relevant projects including biomimetic batteries and ones created using viruses, printed electronic circuits, printed energy harvesting and so on.
16 Aug

N12 Technologies

N12 Technologies manufacture sheets of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) for composite parts. IDTechEx technology analyst Dr Richard Collins interviewed Ian Sanderson (MD Global Business Development).
16 Aug

Particle physicists team up with AI to solve toughest science problems

Researchers from SLAC and around the world increasingly use machine learning to handle Big Data produced in modern experiments and to study some of the most fundamental properties of the universe.
16 Aug

Deeper, more targeted intervention of brain disorders

Nir Grossman is the 2018 grand prize winner of the Science & PINS Prize for Neuromodulation, for his research on a new strategy to stimulate deep and specific regions of the brain without surgery.
15 Aug

Introducing the latest in textiles: Soft hardware

The latest development in textiles and fibers is a kind of soft hardware that you can wear: cloth that has electronic devices built right into it.
14 Aug

Paving the way to highly stretchable and transparent electronics

Scientists have proposed a novel method for the fabrication of highly transparent, electrically conductive, stretchable tough hydrogels modified by single-walled carbon nanotubes.
6 Aug

C2Sense, Inc.

They provide a gas sensing data analytics subscription service, enabled by their proprietary CNT chemiresistive gas sensors, to analyze and detect multi-gases with high selectivity in complex environments
3 Aug

Solar cells need to slim down

Thin-film solar cells could be 1/100th the thickness of a piece of paper and flexible enough to festoon surfaces ranging from an aerodynamically sleek car to clothing. To make thin-film solar cells, scientists are moving beyond the "classic" semiconductor compounds, such as gallium arsenide or silicon, and working instead with other light-harvesting compounds that have the potential to be cheaper and easier to mass produce. The compounds could be widely adopted if they could perform as well as today's technology.
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