Applied Materials

Applied Materials

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Applied Materials is the leader in materials engineering solutions used to produce virtually every new chip and advanced display in the world. Our expertise enables and accelerates innovations from the atomic levels to the macroscale.
Applied Materials offers complete solutions for ultimate frontiers in Printed Electronics: fully automated screen printing lines for additive patterning down to microscale, R2R web coating for innovative flexible solutions, large area deposition systems for oled displays, etc.
 
From internet of things to augmented reality, from personalized healthcare to the newest display technologies for mobile devices, our innovations make possible the technology shaping the future.
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2021
29 Mar 2021

More Than 14 Million Euros for Flexible Battery Research

For batteries to fit into narrow and crooked spaces and to store more energy for e.g. electric mobility, flexibly adaptable cells are required. So far, however, lithium-ion battery cells have been produced in standardized formats and rigid systems.
17 Mar 2021

Electronic Textiles Made With new Cellulose Thread

Electronic textiles offer revolutionary new opportunities in various fields, in particular healthcare. But to be sustainable, they need to be made of renewable materials. A research team now presents a thread made of conductive cellulose, which offers fascinating and practical possibilities for electronic textiles.
10 Mar 2021

Applied Materials Baccini

Applied Materials (Baccini) is a division of Applied Materials that develops and manufactures very high resolution screenprinting equipment. These systems are widely utilized in manufacturing photovoltaic cells, but can also be applied to a wider range of applications across the printed electronics space.
Included are:
28 Jan 2021

Lasers Create Miniature Robots from Bubbles

Robots are widely used to build cars, paint airplanes and sew clothing in factories, but the assembly of microscopic components, such as those for biomedical applications, has not yet been automated. Lasers could be the solution.
12 Jan 2021

3D Printed Smart Gel Changes Shape When Exposed to Light

Inspired by the color-changing skin of cuttlefish, octopuses and squids, engineers have created a 3D printed smart gel that changes shape when exposed to light, becomes "artificial muscle" and may lead to new military camouflage, soft robotics and flexible displays.
2020
16 Dec 2020

Transparent Electronics Materials, Markets 2021-2041

IDTechEx Report: Dr Peter Harrop, Dr Xiaoxi He, Dr Richard Collins, Dr Matthew Dyson, Raghu Das and Luke Gear
28 Nov 2020

Lumiode, Inc.

Lumiode is a semiconductor technology spin-out company from Columbia University. It is based in NYC. The company mainly works on next generation micro-displays for AR application.
28 Oct 2020

3D Printing the First Ever Biomimetic Tongue Surface

Scientists have created synthetic soft surfaces with tongue-like textures for the first time using 3D printing - opening new possibilities for testing oral processing properties of food, nutritional technologies, pharmaceutics and dry mouth therapies.
19 Oct 2020

Engineers Print Wearable Sensors Directly on Skin Without Heat

Wearable sensors are evolving from watches and electrodes to bendable devices that provide far more precise biometric measurements and comfort for users. Now, an international team of researchers has taken the evolution one step further by printing sensors directly on human skin without the use of heat.
5 Oct 2020

Microbots to Kill and Clean Biofilms

Biofilms -- microbial communities that form slimy layers on surfaces -- are difficult to treat and remove, often because the microbes release molecules that block the entry of antibiotics and other therapies. Now, researchers have made magnetically propelled microbots derived from tea buds, which they call "T-Budbots," that can dislodge biofilms, release an antibiotic to kill bacteria, and clean away the debris.
21 Aug 2020

Optics and Displays in AR, VR, and MR 2020-2030: Technologies, Players and Markets

IDTechEx Report: Dr Xiaoxi He
10 Aug 2020

New Fabric Could Help Keep you Cool in the Summer

Researchers have developed a material that cools the wearer without using any electricity. The fabric transfers heat, allows moisture to evaporate from the skin and repels water.
15 Jul 2020

3D Printed Latex Rubber Breakthrough

Researchers have discovered a novel process to 3D print latex rubber, unlocking the ability to print a variety of elastic materials with complex geometric shapes.
14 Jul 2020

Solid-State and Polymer Batteries 2020-2030: Technology, Patents, Forecasts, Players

IDTechEx Report: Dr Xiaoxi He
7 Jul 2020

Researchers Print, Tune Graphene Sensors to Monitor Food Freshness

Researchers dipped their new, printed sensors into tuna broth and watched the readings. It turned out the sensors - printed with high-resolution aerosol jet printers on a flexible polymer film and tuned to test for histamine, an allergen and indicator of spoiled fish and meat - can detect histamine down to 3.41 parts per million.
22 Jun 2020

Materials Opportunities in Emerging Photovoltaics 2020-2040

IDTechEx Report: Dr Peter Harrop and Dr Xiaoxi He
12 Jun 2020

Making 4D Printing More Practical

Soft robots and biomedical implants that reconfigure themselves upon demand are closer to reality with a new way to print shapeshifting materials.
19 May 2020

Brain Signal Measurement Using Printed Tattoo Electrodes

Researchers have developed ultra-light tattoo electrodes that are hardly noticeable on the skin and make long-term measurements of brain activity cheaper and easier.
18 May 2020

Electronics Reshaped 2020-2040

IDTechEx Report: Dr Peter Harrop, Dr Richard Collins and Raghu Das
15 May 2020

Expandable Foam for 3D Printing Large Objects

It's a frustrating limitation of 3D printing: Printed objects must be smaller than the machine making them. Huge machines are impractical for printing large parts because they take up too much space and require excessive time to print. Now, a new material can be used to 3D print small objects that expand upon heating. The foam could find applications in architecture, aerospace and biomedicine.